Voices from Russia

Tuesday, 11 May 2010

Churches in Mezhdurechensk to Stay Open 24/7 after the Mine Accident

Funeral Service for two of the miners killed in the Raspadskaya Mine explosion in Mezhdurechensk.

After the accident at the Raspadskaya mine, local clergy decided to keep churches in Mezhdurechensk area open 24/7 {Mezhdurechensk has @100,000 residents, in Kemerovo Oblast, 3,186 kilometres (1,979 miles) from Moscow and 222 kilometres (138 miles) from Kemerovo, the nearest major airport is at Novokuznetsk, 79 kilometres (49 miles) away: editor}. They will be open 24 hours a day until Soul Saturday on 15 May. Every two hours, clergy in Mezhdurechensk parishes will offer Moliebens for the welfare of the living miners and Pannikhidas for the repose of the miners killed in the explosion. “Keeping the churches open around the clock will allow the relatives of injured and deceased miners to participate in Moliebens and Pannikhidas, which will be served every two hours, and they will have the opportunity of pastoral care from the clergy. After all, the relatives of the miners are either keeping vigil at the hospitals or making arrangements for funerals all around the clock”, said Archpriest Ivan Petruchok, the Dean of the Parishes in the Mezhdurechensk District. With the blessing of Bishop Aristarkh Smirnov of Kemerovo and Novokuznetsk, Moliebens for the health of the miners who remain trapped under the rubble will be served every day in all churches of the diocese until everyone is accounted for. Pannikhidas for those killed in the disaster will be served over the next 40 days, the website of the Diocese of Kemerovo and Novokuznetsk reported. After the tragic explosion at the Raspadskaya mine, Bishop Aristarkh issued an official statement that encouraged people to seek solace in their faith. “It’s easier for believers to accept the difficulties and losses that we encounter upon life’s journey. We see that the people who suffered most from this tragedy, the relatives of those who died, found solace, strength, and courage in their faith, which enables them to endure such a heavy loss”, the bishop’s statement said. The catastrophe at the Raspadskaya mine occurred because of two methane gas explosions on the night of 9 May, with a four-hour interval between them. The number of known victims of the accident now stands at 44 people {different sources give anywhere from 43 to 52 known dead: editor}.

11 May 2010

ANN News

http://www.annews.ru/news/detail.php?ID=224274

Coal Mines Aren’t Just in Pennsylvania… Images of Those Affected by the Raspadskaya Mine Disaster in Mezhdurechensk

Let’s start with some general views of the city of Mezhdurechensk (Kemerovo Oblast. Siberian Federal District) in the Kuzbass in Siberian Russia

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and here’s the other end of town.

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These scenes are all-too-familiar to Russian Orthodox people from Pennsylvania and West Virginia… it’s why we aren’t as prone to believe in Godless Suburban Therapeutese as are Anglo-Saxons. The coal pit and steel mill figure in too many of our family histories… the ancestors of today’s konvertsy exploited our ancestors… we’ve never forgotten that. We paid the price of American industrialisation… they took the benefits.

Spare a prayer for the common working folk of Mezhdurechensk… they’re going to go down in the pit again… don’t forget them.

BMD

Georgian Orthodox Activists Beat Up Blasphemous Author

Members of the Georgian Union of Orthodox Parents beat up both the author of a blasphemous book and staff from the Georgian TV Company Kavkasia, which staged a live discussion of his work. The incident occurred during a debate on a book written by the young author Irakli Deisadze, Тайная сходка (The Mystical Meeting), which is how Deisadze described the Last Supper of Christ with the Apostles, but Orthodox activists labelled it sacrilege and blasphemy. Interfax, citing an anonymous expert, said that the book has an anti-Christian orientation. As he was dissatisfied with the progress of the discussion during the live broadcast, Mr Deisadze demonstratively left the studio. However, some other members of the Union of Orthodox Parents were waiting for him out on the street. They beat up both the young author and a friend who was with him. Then, the believers broke into the studio, which resulted in a scuffle, resulting in a real Donnybrook Fair (погром). Several people were injured, including members of the broadcast staff. It took the intervention of the cops to defuse the situation. The procurator opened a criminal case [in regards to this incident].

11 May 2010

ANN News

http://www.annews.ru/news/detail.php?ID=224280

Editor’s Note:

Although beating somebody up is probably not the best way of saying, “I think we have a disagreement in opinion”, one also has to say that the secularists ask for it at times… in any case, it shows that the Georgians CARE. In all too many cases, those who tut-tut over such incidents are those who don’t believe in the reality of miracles, who dump on the saints (or call them mad), and make excuses for inexcusable behaviour by Church higher-ups. Caveat auditor.

As for me, I would tend to forgive the ordinary believers… their hearts are in the right place.

BMD

Miracles of St George: For the Benefit of Russia

The Intercession of St George the Great Martyr and Conqueror: The Guardian Angel of Russia during the Terrible Trial of 1941-45 (anonymous, 2009). I apologise for the resolution of this image… it’s the only downloadable one I could find.

An art exhibition dedicated to St George the all-Victorious, one of the most revered saints in Russia, opened in Kaluga

On 6 May, the art exhibition Торжество добра (The Triumph of Goodness) opened in Kaluga on the feastday of one of the most venerated saints in Russia, St George the all-Victorious. Over the centuries, people thought of him as the Guardian Angel of Russia; he has been considered the patron saint of Russian warriors for many years. On the eve of the 65th anniversary of the Great Victory over the Fascists, the organisers wanted to emphasise the substantive reality of the Holy Martyr. In all, the project involved more than 60 Russian artists. The theme of the competition that is part of the exhibition is “St George and the Dragon”. It’s probably the most famous story about the saint, it symbolises the victory of good over evil. Incidentally, this image is on the coat of arms of Moscow.

St George: From the Series “12 Good Works” (Yekaterna Medvedeva, 2007)

Of course, every artist represented at the exhibition has his own vision of the image, his own individual taste, and his own style. Yekaterina Medvedeva portrayed a primitivistic St George, a child-like image from a fairy tale; Yevgenia Kokoreva drew an expressive sketch of a tragic character, the saint sent aid to the prisoners of fascist concentration camps. Yevgenia Kudrina created a sculpture from a block of old wood, she gave us a stern warrior in a high cap sitting on a small horse with a spear… the dragon is made of wire and is barely visible, just as it is hard to discern evil in real life, but the lance of St George does not miss him.

St George: From the Series “12 Good Works” (Yevgenia Kokoreva, 2010)

A unique icon, created by icon St George Meshchovsk Monastery near Kaluga, is the centrepiece of the exhibition  Even the title of the work is unusual, The Intercession of St George the Great Martyr and Conqueror: The Guardian Angel of Russia during the Terrible Trial of 1941-45. This icon, if we use the language of secular art criticism, is a half-length portrait of St George surrounded by so-called vignettes, anecdotal portrayals.

St George: From the Series “12 Good Works” (Yevgenia Kudrina, 2009)

Fr Georgy, the abbot of the monastery where it was created, noted, “The organisers themselves were not fully aware of the fullness of the size and depth of the project. They didn’t imagine that it would turn into a judgment and assessment of contemporary mankind. St George has been a symbol of Russia since ancient times. As each person has a guardian angel, so Russia as a whole has a defender in St George. We venerate him and give him thanks for taking all of Russia under his wings in the terrible time of the war against Hitlerite fascism. Therefore, the vignettes surrounding the main icon portray seven historical events telling us how Great Martyr George helped Russia”.

St George and the Dragon: From the Series “12 Good Works” (Sergei Kuzin, 2007)

He went on to say, “For example, the 900-day Nazi siege of Leningrad was lifted on the feastday of St Nina the Equal-to-the-Apostles. She was a cousin of the Great Martyr George, one of the vignettes calls her his sister, and she is shown breaking the blockade to bring aid to the starving people [of Leningrad]. Soviet troops launched their counteroffensive in the Battle of Moscow on the feastday of the Archangel Michael. On another vignette, St George the all-Victorious can be seen asking for the help [of St Michael], “The Lord has entrusted to me this power, so that I can be their protector”.

St George: The Struggle: From the Series “12 Good Works” (Viktor Burtas, 2008)

In conclusion, Igumen Georgy said, “St George the all-Victorious, along with the Archangel Michael helped the Russian soldiers to strike the foe. In the battle for Königsberg, now Kaliningrad, St George called upon the assistance of the very Queen of Heaven. Together with the angels, she descended from heaven, all shrouded in mist, and the weapons of the Fascists fell silent… Indeed, over the image of the Great Martyr, the Assembly of all the Russian Saints, headed by St George, implores the Mother of God, ‘Do not abandon Great Russia!’”

St George: From the Series “12 Good Works” (Yuri Popkov, 2009)

Many people sincerely believe in the miracles that came from the intercession of St George, for others he is a nothing but a symbolic image. However, for the artists, there is no doubt that he was a source of inspiration.

7 May 2010

Karina Ivashko

Voice of Russia World Service

http://rus.ruvr.ru/2010/05/07/7494901.html

Editor’s Note:

Here is an example of how the revival in Russia is touching all facets of life. Indeed, Orthodoxy is so much more than a religion; it is so much more than just services or lives of saints (important as they are). Orthodoxy is more than just the heavenlies… it’s the earthlies as well… otherwise, you are nothing but a strutting and preening Gnostic, obvious to everyone but yourself.

By their fruits ye shall know them!

Look at the fruits of the revival in Russia… churches reopening, people being baptised, Easter being celebrated, the icon corner in the house restored, kids learning about God… it’s a GOOD beginning! Look at who’s coming to Christ… painters, rockers, bikers, cosmonauts, politicians, ordinary folk… just about all kinds, no? Pluck one fruit from the tree and taste it… ain’t it great?

In comparison, you have konvertsy who think that they can separate the faith from its cultural background. Congratulations, fools… you KILLED IT. Instead of lived Orthodoxy, there is a oddball combination of Evangelical Anglican and Radical Proddie notions unfit for real Christians. You don’t have to taste this fruit… just look at it! YUCK!! I’m not even touching it… let alone taste it… I’d gag and die!

You can have Living Orthodoxy, as embodied in this art exhibition, or, you can have Notional Orthodoxy, as embodied by the stuck-up pseudo-academics at SVS (along with the bunch at New Skete and Platina) and their airy-fairy writings. You pays your money and you takes your choice. I’ve made mine… hey, that ain’t fair… are you telling me it’s that obvious? Sheesh… you’re no fun. Well, here’s to me, here’s to you, and to the devil with all those who fling poo at the Tradition!

BMD

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