Voices from Russia

Saturday, 2 July 2011

2 July 2011. Some of My Favourite Things… Frappé Coffee… JUST Right for a Summer Afternoon

Filed under: domestic life,food and cooking,Greece and Greeks — 01varvara @ 00.00

Now, here’s the ticket for a lazy summer day… have yourself a tall glass of Frappé Coffee with a slug of Metaxas added… that’s heaven on earth, Greek style…

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Firstly, I’m going to say something that’s gonna give all the foodies within a fifty klick radius spasms and heart attacks… if you want to make a genuine Frappé Coffee with long-lasting foam, you can’t use freeze-dried instant coffee, you’ve got to use old fashioned el cheapo Nescafé. That’s right… there’s something in the freeze dried stuff that inhibits foam formation and endurance. As the foam is one of the distinct characteristics of Frappé Coffee, it’s best to seek out what’s going to ensure a long-lasting “head”. To make the foam, you can shake 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of instant coffee with ¼ cup (50 ml) water and the desired amount of sugar with ice vigorously in a cocktail shaker for at least two minutes, or, you can use a small hand mixer to create the foam. For a regular Frappé, put in 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of sugar, if you want it sweeter, put in an additional tablespoon of  sugar. Then, you’d pour it into a tall glass with ice, the right order of assembling a Frappé after making foam is to put the ice in the glass, add up to 1 cup (250 ml) evaporated milk (if using), then, than fill the glass with cold water, if necessary. If you wish to omit the milk, and only use cold water, do so… both styles are common in Greece and Cyprus. Frappé is ALWAYS sipped through a straw.

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Here’s a Frappé with milk…

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Ice cubes are essential to Frappé. Apart from keeping the coffee cold, they’re part of Greek Frappé culture. You rotate your drinking straw, mixing cold water near the ice cubes with the less cold water at the bottom, further mixing the foam (that contains coffee) with the water. If you rotate the straw in a circle at the bottom of the glass, the ice cubes hit each other and the glass, producing a sound characteristic of the Frappé. Mixing the coffee and listening to this sound has a pleasing effect, at least, that’s what most Frappé drinkers think. People often add a shot of Kahlúa, Baileys Irish Cream, Metaxas, or other liqueur to add some “kick” to their Frappé, whilst others use chocolate milk in place of the evaporated milk. Many restaurants add a ball of vanilla ice-cream to their frappe instead of milk. Although not technically Frappé (since they aren’t shaken), this is stirred vigorously with a spoon, creating a slightly different texture and taste. In Bulgaria, sometimes, Coca-Cola is used instead of water (possibly, the inspiration for Coca-Cola Blāk).

Enjoy! Приятного аппетита! Bon appétit!

BMD

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