Voices from Russia

Friday, 11 November 2011

Austerity is NOT the Answer

Filed under: economy,EU,politics — 01varvara @ 00.00
Tags: , , , ,

How ’bout some AUSTERITY for these guys?

______________________________

The most dangerous myth of all is that governments can best contribute to economic recovery through policies of austerity, cutting government spending, and raising taxation. The proponents of such action claim that as well as reducing debt, such policies will make room for the private sector to expand. We can trace the idea of “expansionary austerity” to work undertaken in the 1990s by Alberto Alesina and various co-authors. Although widely discredited (even by some of his co-authors), these ideas appeal to the wishful thinking of those who want to see themselves as “wise men”, the equivalents of the Very Serious People who stand for the conventional wisdom in US policy debates. In fact, there’s overwhelming evidence that the short-term impact of austerity measures is to reduce the rate of economic growth, thereby reducing government revenues and increasing necessary expenditure on unemployment benefits and other welfare measures. As well as worsening the recession, these effects will offset much of the improvement in the budget balance that one might expect from austerity measures. In the long run, it is clear that Greece (and to a lesser extent other European countries) needs to improve its budget balance. The experience of the crisis suggests, if anything, that the target of a deficit equal to 3 per cent of national income, and debt equal to 60 per cent of national income weren’t ambitious enough. To respond adequately to a crisis, governments need the fiscal space created by exercising discipline in good times. However, these are not good times. There’s no point fixing long-term budget problems if the short-term result is the collapse of national economies, and possibly of the Euro-zone as a whole. Of all the myths coming out of the Greek crisis, austerity is the most dangerous.

11 November 2011

John Quiggin

The Daily Beast

http://news.yahoo.com/five-myths-greek-crisis-151500373.html

Editor’s Note:

I’d simply add that the resounding two-to-one defeat of John Kasich’s union-busting attempt in Ohio shows that the people are NOT going to give back the gains of the New Deal… at least, not any more. The fatcat denizens of McMansions must shoulder their fair share of the burden… and if they refuse to do so, I’d advise them not to be surprised if an angry mob shows up outside their door. People get funny when their livelihoods are threatened… I’m not making threats, I’m simply prophesying…

BMD

British Judge Rules Church Liable For Abuse Claim

______________________________

Editor’s Foreword:

As you read this, be aware that the OCA’s lawyers in the Velencia case took the tack that as Velencia was an “independent contractor”, they were off the hook for any liability incurred by Mr Velencia’s actions (such as spreading Kristi Koumentakos’ personal information amongst the Metropolitan Council). I’d say that Velencia was a “priest in good standing” in the OCA and that the Metropolitan Council of the OCA is an official OCA body. In short, the OCA was neck-deep in the kimchi in the Koumentakos affair. They got off easy… oh, yes; Fathausen believes that forgiveness means that clergy get a “Get out of Jail, Free” card for their every offence against believers. I just thought that you’d like to know that…

BMD

******

Observers said that a High Court judge‘s ruling in London on 8 November that the Roman Catholic Church would be liable for alleged sexual abuse committed by one of its priests is likely to have repercussions in other countries. Justice Alistair MacDuff ruled the Bishop of Portsmouth, Crispian Hollis, would be liable for compensating a former resident of a Catholic children’s home, if she can prove her claim that a priest within the diocese raped and abused her. “This case will have enormous implications for compensation claims, not only in Britain, but in other countries who pay close attention to the law here on this issue. I think it could make quite as big difference to other churches, too, who have argued in the past that priests are not employees but office holders”, said the BBC’s religious affairs correspondent Robert Piggott. The Times of London said, “The case will have major consequences for compensation claims by abuse victims in Britain and is being closely watched around the world”.

It was the first time British courts had to decide whether the church is responsible, or “vicariously liable”, for the actions of its priests. MacDuff’s ruling captured the attention of church leaders in other countries where litigants have brought claims for sexual abuse against priests. Lawyers acting on behalf of the Catholic Church immediately sought permission to appeal the decision. A woman identified as “JGE” brought the case. She said that Fr Wilfred Baldwin raped and sexually abused her when she was living at a place called The Firs, a Catholic children’s home at Waterlooville in Hampshire, in southern England, in the 1970s. Baldwin died in 2006. Lawyers for the church argued that it shouldn’t have to pay compensation to victims of sexual abuse because priests are not employees, but are self-employed (!). The argument represented a departure by the church, which previously admitted liability and paid settlements.

MacDuff noted the Diocese of Portsmouth’s argument that the priest hadn’t been an employee in the formal sense and had no formal contract, supervision, or wages. However, he added, “The Church had given him full authority, the premises, the pulpit, and the clerical robes. He was directed into the community with that full authority and was given free rein to act as a representative of the Church. He had immense power handed to him. It was they who appointed him to the position which (if the allegations be proved) he abused”. Lord Edward Faulks, QC, representing the Diocese of Portsmouth, denied that the church was seeking to avoid responsibility for compensating victims. “My clients take sexual abuse extremely seriously and are very concerned to eradicate and investigate it”, he said.

9 November 2011

Trevor Grundy

Ecumenical News International

http://www.eni.ch/rss/

Editor’s Afterword:

Let’s keep it simple. By substituting the words “OCA” for “Church”, and “Velencia” for “He”, we come up with an interesting statement. “[The OCA] had given [Velencia] full authority, the premises, the pulpit, and the clerical robes. [Velencia] was directed into the community with that full authority and was given free rein to act as a representative of the [OCA]. [Velencia] had immense power handed to him. [The OCA] appointed [Velencia] to the position which (if the allegations be proved) he abused”. Paffhausen’s attempts to use “forgiveness” as a cover for abusive clerical behaviour are blasphemous in the extreme. He spits on Our Lord Christ, and no one dares stand up to him. Well… I do so! J’accuse! If there are rotten priests allowed to run rampant, it’s because the leadership is corrupt to the bone, both in a spiritual sense and in a fiduciary sense, and evil according to the canons of good-sense and pragmatism. Mark this down and ponder it… Fathausen REFUSES to repudiate Gleb Podmoshensky. He also REFUSES to disown what he did under Podmoshensky’s aegis. If the leadership winks at abuse, why should we wonder if the underlings run amuck?

Fathausen delenda est… there’s no other way…

BMD

11 November 2011. I’m Drowning in a Sea of Verbiage… Can Someone Tell the SVS Commandos the Meaning of “Concise” and “To the Point?”

Holy Shit

Dan Tague

undated (2010s?)

American

______________________________

An informant sent me this:

I have to say that the next generation might be worse than anything we have seen so far. Talk about diarrhoea of the mouth on a simple update of a service schedule. Check it out.

Date: 11 November 2011 (15.28 EST)

From: Alexander Rentel

To: (the usual cast of suspects, a lawyer friend said that I couldn’t post their names or e-mail addresses… but they’re not unknown to you, they truly aren’t)

Subject: Re: From SVS: Memorial Announcement

To all:

This note has a twofold purpose:

a)   to remind everyone of our upcoming All-night Vigil

b)   to provide a few more details

On Sunday, 20 November, we will celebrate the All-night Vigil culminating in the early hours of Monday morning, 21 November, with the celebration of the festal Divine Liturgy for the feast of the Entrance into the Temple of the Theotokos. The schedule for November 20-21, as has already been published, is as follows:

Sunday, 20 November

09.00: Divine Liturgy

17.00: Little Vespers

20.30: All-night Vigil

Monday, 21 November

Around 00.00: Festal Divine Liturgy

21.30: Little Compline

Weather permitting, we will make a solemn procession around the Chapel at the litya during Vespers. Between Great Vespers and Matins, we will read a sermon on the feast by St Gregory Palamas. Likewise, after the 6th ode of the canon, we will read the longer Synaxarion reading. While I anticipate that we will do the services in a much fuller sense than we normally celebrate, including the chanting of a full kathisma, reading both canons at Matins, chanting troparia on the Beatitudes at liturgy, we will make a few adjustments, notably we will start the liturgy after the singing of the Great Doxology at Matins. A few years ago when we celebrated a vigil in this way for the commemoration of St Nicholas, we ended Matins at around midnight and the liturgy around 1:30 am. I expect that even though we are starting a little earlier (so we can make a procession), the times for the services will roughly be the same. Needless to say, celebrating an All-night Vigil requires great effort on the part of all the participants. As such, I would especially ask that all those assigned to read, sing, and serve fulfil their ministry with all care and attentiveness. The hour will be late; the services will be long. It will be easy to give in to all sorts of temptation during this service. We should therefore redouble our efforts to stay focused on the task at hand. Such effort, such ascetical effort will be greatly rewarded. If there are any questions regarding this service, please contact me.

Fr AR

******

Bozhe moi! I can see what the autocephalist fanatics did at the Sobor… they just droned on and on… they put every else to sleep! Here’s how I’d edit the announcement:

The schedule for 20-21 November is as follows:

Sunday, 20 November

09.00: Divine Liturgy

17.00: Little Vespers

20.30: All-night Vigil

Monday, 21 November

Around 00.00: Festal Divine Liturgy

21.30: Little Compline

We’ll process around the Chapel at the litya during Vespers, and between Great Vespers and Matins, we’ll read a sermon on the feast. Likewise, after the 6th ode of the canon, we’ll read the longer Synaxarion reading. We’ll start the Liturgy after the singing of the Great Doxology at Matins. If there are any questions regarding this service, please contact me.

Fr AR

******

There! That does it and conveys all the actual information that was in the original without any of Rentel’s noxious logorrhoea. Where do they dig up such posturing phonies and charlatans? Did SVS and Syosset get a discount for purchasing them by the gross? God do save us from such self-serving shit. I wonder what Fr Basil Stroyen and Archbishop Kyprian Borisevich would’ve done to Rentel for his grandstanding? Perspirin’ minds wanna know…

Barbara-Marie Drezhlo

Friday 11 November 2011

Albany NY

Sergei Yolkin’s World: “Virtual” Carparks

“Virtual” Carparks

Sergei Yolkin

2011

______________________________

Some new carparks near the Moscow courts don’t allow for convenient parking. In some places, the spaces are marked in such a way that you simply can’t park a car there. The Moscow authorities acknowledged that they’ve heard complaints about “virtual” parking spaces, and they say that they’re ready to correct their mistakes.

18 October 2011

Sergei Yolkin

RIA-Novosti

http://ria.ru/caricature/20111018/463416069.html

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.