Voices from Russia

Friday, 10 May 2013

Volodya’s Cycling Friend: ALWAYS On His Shoulder

00a Volodya and Cat. Krasnoyarsk. Russia. 10.05.13

******

00b Volodya and Cat. Krasnoyarsk. Russia. 10.05.13

******

00c Volodya and Cat. Krasnoyarsk. Russia. 10.05.13

______________________________

Volodya’s from Krasnoyarsk, in Siberia. He rides his bike every day on Tatyshev Island in the Yenisei River. He does it in good company… his cat is always on his shoulder! Volodya found the poor kitten in a tree… crows were trying to attack it. So, he had to climb up the tree to reach the kitten; he didn’t plan it, but he took the kitten home. He wanted to put the kitten in his backpack or near his chest, but the animal chose the best place by itself, he sat on Volodya’s shoulder. That’s how he took the little cat home. In summer 2010, when it was over 30 degrees (86 degrees Fahrenheit), they shocked everybody in Krasnoyarsk by taking part in a cycling marathon and riding together almost 100 kilometres (62 miles)! Several times, Volodya stopped and gave water to his cat; when they reached the finish line, both were exhausted… the cat laid down in the shade of the bushes to rest. However, in just a half-hour, it was full of energy and happiness again.

7 May 2013

English Russia

http://englishrussia.com/2013/05/07/cat-and-man-always-cycling-together/#more-123190

In 2013, Siberian Bears Better Behaved After Hibernation

00k Bears of Lake Kurilsk. Kamchatka. 15.11.12

______________________________

On Friday, Konstantin Osadchy, head of the nature protection committee in Tomsk, told RIA-Novosti that bears waking up after their winter hibernation in Tomsk Oblast in Siberia are better behaved this year than last year, saying, “Compared to this time in previous years, things are somehow calmer now, there were times when we had to shoot about a dozen [bears] between the end of April and beginning of May”.

At this time of year, Russian bears wake up from their winter hibernation hungry, and often head to populated areas in search of food. Usually, the authorities only shoot them after local forest rangers or other officials deem that they pose a danger to the human population or livestock in a region. The bear population in the area is growing. In 2011, there were about 8,800 bears in the Tomsk Region, whereas in 1997 the bear population there was just 2,800. Therefore, any decrease in incidents is not down to a decline in the bear population.

Osadchy told us that, so far, they’ve only to shoot one bear in Tomsk Oblast. In 2012, 33 “hooligan bears” as the Russian media dubs them, had to be shot. In 2011, this figure was higher still, at about 50. In recent years, in the Russian Far East, bears dug up corpses in a cemetery, and begged for food from passing cars along a highway.

10 May 2013

RIA-Novosti

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20130510/181068221/Siberian-Bears-Better-Behaved-After-Hibernation-in-2013–.html

“The Sentiments Expressed by the Bolotnaya Square Protesters are Different from those Expressed by Other Protesters in Russia”: Natalia Narochnitskaya

00 RIA-Novosti Infographics. Portrait of a Protestor. 2012

______________________________

Valdaiclub.com interview with Natalia Narochnitskaya, Director of the Institute of Democracy and Cooperation in Paris and president of the Historical Perspective Foundation in Moscow

VC

Do you think the inspections of NGOs by the Prokuratura discredit these groups in the eyes of society, which is the goal, or do they discredit the government?

Narochnitskaya

It depends. The Western media are sure that these inspections discredit the authorities… that’s how they portray these audits. These NGOs, especially the most-high-profile ones, are their icons and they’ll portray them as heroes. As for Russian society, certain people, mainly in Moscow, share this view, but people in the rest of Russia don’t see these inspections as discrediting the authorities in any way. It’s important to understand that our society doesn’t have a united stand on this issue. The sentiments expressed by the Bolotnaya Square protesters are different from those expressed by other protesters in Russia. That’s my answer.

VC

Will these inspections further strain relations between activists and the authorities?

Narochnitskaya

Again, it depends. I think there are two unequal camps in the activist community. The *liberal Western-oriented camp that calls itself the “non-systemic” opposition is concentrated in Moscow and it’s very small on a national scale. However, this is the only opposition that the West notices, and, as a result, they’ll probably grow even more hysterical in their hatred of the Russian government.

*”liberal” in Russian terms is the same as the Anglospherelibertarian”. The latter term isn’t part of Russian intellectual/political discourse. That is, when a Russian attacks “liberalism”, they attack the non-regulatory Hobbesian anarchism of the Anglosphere Right. That is, Russians uncontaminated by Western constructs oppose and anathematise anarchy of any sort; it doesn’t matter if it’s religious anarchy (“evangelicalsectarianism… an Orthodox bishop called it “Christian atheism”… how true!), societal anarchy (libertarianism), intellectual anarchy (“anarchy” per se), or moral anarchy (immorality)… in Russian terms, all four have an intimate and indissoluble correlation.

As for the majority of activists in the rest of Russia, they lean more towards left-wing views. They aren’t sad that the 1990s are over, but they feel like the car broke down on the road leading away from the ‘90s. These people are more worried about pensions, re-industrialisation, jobs, fighting corruption, and the decline of Russians as the dominant ethnic group in the country. However, they like Russia’s strong foreign policy and tough response to Western pressure. I don’t think these audits had any effect on their attitudes. They might even welcome them.

VC

Do you think there’s a connection between the audits of the Konrad Adenauer Foundation (KAS) and the Friedrich Ebert Foundation (FES), during which the auditors removed their computers and papers with Angela Merkel’s position on Cyprus?

Narochnitskaya

Maybe, but I don’t think so. By the way, in the West, many experts believe this, and in private conversation they’ll say that EU leaders probably gave Cyprus an ultimatum… make no agreements with Russia, or you won’t receive any cash and the EU will simply engineer its collapse in one week. I’ve heard this from British and French experts. In a brief statement on Cyprus’s collapse, Viktor Gerashchenko said off-the-cuff that probably this decision was directed against Russia and that Cyprus was being punished for its pro-Russian position and refusal to let the West anywhere near the deposits discovered on the country’s continental shelf. There was a risk that Russia might get a hold in this key strategic area in the Mediterranean. Nevertheless, I still believe that the EU had bigger motives in Cyprus. We can hardly consider the removal of computers as a “retaliatory measure”. They simply caught these NGOs in the same net as all the others.

VC

Do you think that these inspections are a pretext to put off the issue of establishing visa-free travel between Russia and Europe?

Narochnitskaya

For Europe and the EU, this is the pretext they’ve been looking for in order to hold up a process that they’re simply not ready for. No doubt, they’ll use it and cling to it. However, in reality… and experts have long known this… they aren’t ready for visa-free travel with Russia. They’re doing everything to impede the process, saying that they’ll have to deal with a wave of illegal workers from Asia and the Caucasus.

VC

What problems are Russian NGOs facing abroad?

Narochnitskaya

The media speaks ill of Russia or not at all. The French press is in the lead and the European media in general is acting in much the same manner. They welcome only those Russian NGOs that rabidly insist that no country in the world is worse and has fewer rights than post-Yeltsin Russia. They invite such people to speak on television very often. By the way, they’re from NGOs that receive official funds from the US budget. The US Congress is partially-financing institutions of the Republican and Democratic parties, Freedom House, Human Rights Watch, and many Russian NGOs. I shudder to think what they would’ve written about my Institute of Democracy and Cooperation if we’d received a penny from the Russian budget.

By the way, I’ve just come back from America where I had a conversation with a prominent banking analyst. I asked him directly what he thinks about the campaign in the press against the new law requiring that NGOs funded from abroad must declare this if they conduct political activities in Russia. He laughed and said that in the USA foreign funding of political activities carries criminal penalties. He said a man from China contributed to a local election campaign in one city and received a 10-year prison term.

No matter what we do and what important events with distinguished people we hold, there’ll be little or no coverage. Sometimes, they invite us to be on television. If a Russian NGO in a foreign country doesn’t spew hatred for the government, even if it readily discusses our sins, they’ll always describe it as a Kremlin agency funded by the budget, even though this is a total lie. This is the constant insinuation you hear, based on some blogs. The academic community in Europe is much fairer and more objective, and it’s easier to work with them. We’re trying to involve them in serious roundtables where we always criticise corruption and other vices in Russian politics or the economy. Three years ago, our office in Paris opened with a seminar offering a comparative analysis of anti-corruption laws in France and Russia, which put Russia in an unfavourable light. We had interesting speakers on our side, and we acknowledged that corruption is a systemic problem that can’t be resolved quickly. However, nobody cares about this.

Here’s another example of what often happens. When my name came up in connection with the establishment of my institute’s office in Paris, many newspapers asked me for an interview… l’Express, Le Figaro, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, and The Chicago Tribune {did Sophia Kishkovsky or Serge Schmemann interview Professor Narochnitskaya? Perspirin’ minds wanna know…: editor}. I talked with all of them at least for an hour about everything, including culture, insight into life in each other’s countries, and the desire to break the glass wall of misunderstanding that separates us. A French woman from l’Express and I even got to talking about Baudelaire’s poetry and hugged each other goodbye. You should’ve seen what her newspaper wrote! I regretted that I was so naïve and didn’t switch on the recorder. I could’ve published it online so that everyone could see that they clearly instructed her to write a negative story. Nevertheless, I didn’t say anything negative and she published in her newspaper three routine anti-Putin paragraphs that had nothing to do with our conversation and one sentence about our meeting… “This is the aim of the agency that will be headed by Natalia Narochnitskaya, whom I had a chance to meet”.

I can concur on Professor Narochnitskaya’s observation. Western media sorts NEVER tell it as you tell it and you must use the utmost caution in talking to them. Never be verbose… be concise, for they can edit your words in such a way that it’ll seem that you either support their position or that you’re a marginal nutter (this is particularly true of TV presenters). In fact, very few Western “authority figures” tell the truth (“winning by any means, fair or foul” is the most important component of the Western Corporate Weltanschauung)… be very, very careful in your dealings with them, especially, with clergy… never talk to a clergyman on substantive matters without a witness or two (doubly so, if he’s a convert or an SVS grad). As Paffhausen illustrated, all too often, they do lie whenever it’s convenient for them, and they’re bloody sincere and unctuous about it, too…

Frankfurter Allgemeine was the only newspaper to report what I said without sneering and in good faith. Its coverage reflected their understanding of what I said. An article in Le Figaro read, “Oh what a fierce debater they’ve sent from Russia!” I take pride in this! Speaking about freedom of the press in the West, the press is so subordinated to editorial policy that it’s long ceased to reflect the diversity of public thinking and public opinion in its own countries. Public opinion in these countries is much more complex, and many more people are quite fair in their views of Russia. I won’t say they’re fond of Russia, but they’re willing to listen calmly to positive information about the country. My European friends and partners tell me they’re sick and tired of hysterical Russophobia in the press. Incidentally, already, Russophobia has become marginal. The articles by André Glucksman have become so grotesque that they remind me of our incomparable Valeria Novodvorskaya {a pro-Western Quisling… she writes for the New York Times… did this traitor mentor Sophia Kishkovsky? Interesting angle, no?: editor}. The press has taken it so far that soon its coverage will have the opposite effect. This is what happened with anti-capitalist propaganda in the Khrushchyov era. We’ll discuss this problem… the origins of Russophobia… at a conference at Sapienza University of Rome in Italy in May, which I’m attending. The Italian side, not us, suggested the idea. This is already a good sign.

8 May 2013

Valdai Discussion Club

http://valdaiclub.com/politics/58200.html

10 May 2013. A Picture IS Worth a Thousand Words… HH’s Attitude to the Great Victory

00 Patriarch Kirill. Moscow. Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. 10.05.13

______________________________

Here, HH laid a wreath to commemorate the war dead at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in the Aleksandrovsky Sad in Moscow. That is, HH gives due honour and respect to the Great Victory and to the achievements of the USSR, unlike some ROCOR sorts I could name (but I won’t… you know who they are… they post fatuous bloviations on the ROCOR official website). Here’s the choice on offer… you can stand with HH and honour Victory Day, or, you can stand with fathead faction in the ROCOR (thank God, that’s NOT all ROCOR people) and honour the Almighty Dollar. That’s the real world choice. You KNOW where I stand.

BMD

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.