Voices from Russia

Sunday, 7 August 2016

7 August 2016. 101 Years Since the “Attack of the Dead” at the Osovets Fortress

00 Anniversary of the Attack of the Dead. Russia. 070816

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One of the things that the German found out during the two major wars of the 20th century was that Russian soldiers were tenacious, determined, stubborn, and had an utter contempt for death. The Anglo Americans seem to think that they can just push over Russians. At the “Attack of the Dead”, Russian soldiers attacked, spitting up blood from chemical weapon wounds as they did so. Russians haven’t changed one iota… the Anglos would get a sore surprise if they tried to attack the Rodina. The Americans haven’t faced a peer foe since Korea… when the Sovs and Chinese whipped their ass and won their objective (restoring the status quo ante). Remember, Anglos BELIEVE their rubbishy propaganda… God do spare us…

BMD

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7 August 2016. From the Russian Web… A Feral Cat’s Plea

Filed under: animals,Russian — 01varvara @ 00.00
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

00 kitten 070816

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7 August 2016. Vladimir Putin on the West

00 Putin on the west russia 070816

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There is a civilisational gulf between the West and the rest of the world. The West wants to ram its potty non-culture down the throats of the rest of the world. The rest of the world isn’t buying it. If the West tries to impose its notions by force, I fear that they’d find themselves overmatched. Just sayin’…

BMD

7 August 2016. Adventures in Translation Land… Y’all Come and Be Welcome!

00 russia ukha fish soup 070816

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Literally, “Милости прошу к нашему шалашу!” means “Ask grace upon our humble hut”, or more idiomatically, “Welcome to our humble abode!” This is idiomatic colloquial Russian at its best. It’s always informal and jocular, usually used as a cheerful invitation to share a meal. In English, the direct equivalents would be “Y’all come and be welcome”, “The door’s open wide, do step inside”, and “Sit a spell and take a load off your feet”. Translation is an art, not a science… it’s NEVER boring…

One last thing… the image is a pot of Ukha… the famous Russian fish soup, best made with freshly-caught fish from one’s own hand over a fire at camp at the lakeside in the shade…

BMD

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