Voices from Russia

Saturday, 28 February 2015

28 February 2015. Didya Know What “Nimoy” (Нимой) Means in English?

01 red-question-mark

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The word Нимой in Russian means “mute”… “unspeaking”. There’s no doubt that Leonard Nimoy‘s people came from Grodno Guberniya (in present-day Belarus). You’d also like to know that his zayde was a passionate socialist, a keen reader of the Forverts (Jewish Daily Forward). For years, Leonard Nimoy hung out at the Science Museum in Boston… he was passionately involved with real science. He’s not the only famous actor with a Russian connection… there’s also David Duchovny (Духовний)… he starred in the spooky X-Files. His surname means “spiritual”… believe it or not! Hmm… Jack Palance of the spooky voice was actually Vladimir Palaniuk of Luzerne County in NEPA… just as Natalie Wood was really Natalia Nikolaevna Zacharenko of San Francisco CA. Her parents were from Siberia… they weren’t “Ukrainian” at all. Yes… she stayed a loyal Russian Orthodox Christian all her life. You see, some names do have meanings… for instance “Fireri” (of Guy Fieri of the Food Network) means “proud” in English… and Guy Fieri does have a whole lotta chutzpah and confidence.

My thanks to the Cabineteer who proposed this idea. Some of my best ideas come from my friends… I’m truly blessed…

BMD

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Monday, 9 February 2015

Po-Nashemu Film Noir Queen Dies at 92

00 Lizabeth Scott. film noir. 09.02.15

Lizabeth Scott, Don DeFore, and Kristine Miller in Too Late For Tears.

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On 31 January, actress Lizabeth Scott, whose sultry looks and smoky voice led many a man astray in 1940s and ’50s film noir, died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. She was 92. Her longtime friend Mary Goodstein said that the cause was congestive heart failure.

Scott aspired to be a stage actress, but got stereotyped as a femme fatale in the hard-boiled, film noir world of crime, tough talk, and dark secrets. On Friday, Alan Rode, a film historian who produces annual film noir festivals, said, “She had the smouldering look, the blond hair, the voice. She was someone you’d see in a nightclub through a haze of cigarette smoke, with a voice made husky by a couple of highballs and an unfiltered Pall Mall”. Scott starred in numerous films in the genre, mostly as the bad girl… or as the good girl gone bad… with evocative titles such as Dead Reckoning, I Walk Alone, Pitfall, and Too Late for Tears. She inspired lines such as, “What a fall guy I am, thinking just because you’re good to look at you’d be good all the way through”. Burt Lancaster said that to her in the 1948 drama I Walk Alone, which also starred Kirk Douglas. However, her characters could snap back too. She asked Robert Mitchum in The Racket (1951), “Who said I was an honest citizen, and where would it get me if I was?”

She described herself to Dick Powell in the 1948 film Pitfall as “a girl whose first engagement ring was bought by a man stupid enough to embezzle and stupid enough to get caught”. She also played opposite Humphrey Bogart, Barbara Stanwyck, and Van Heflin. In a 1996 interview with documentary filmmaker Carole Langer, Scott said she didn’t lament the fact that she wasn’t cast in studio blockbusters. She liked the grittiness of film noir, saying, “The films that I’d seen growing up were always, ‘boy meets girl, boy ends up marrying girl, they go off into the sunset’. After the war, films got more in touch with the psychological, emotional things that people feel and people do. It was a new realm, and it was very exciting, because suddenly you were coming closer and closer to reality”.

She was born Emma Matzo on 29 September 1922 in Scranton PA, where her father had a grocery store. In her late teens, she left to study acting in New York, landing a role in a touring company of the hit stage comedy Hellzapoppin’. In 1942, she got a small part in the original Broadway production of Thornton Wilder’s The Skin of Our Teeth. Scott also understudied the lead role, and then got to play it in Boston, turning down interest from Hollywood to further her stage career. At that point, her stage name was Elizabeth Scott… she later removed the “E” to be more distinctive. When she finally came west, prominent producer Hal Wallis signed her.

After several years of making one film noir after another… sometimes, at a pace of two or three in a year… Scott was ready for a change. She got it in the 1953 comedy Scared Stiff starring Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. She said in the Langer interview, “I’d done so many heavy things that it was such a pleasure when this was offered me. I thought, ‘God, I’d like to shed my past and have some fun with these guys'”. There were other varied roles… Scott played a publicity woman in the 1957 Elvis Presley vehicle Loving You. However, as noir faded, so did her career. She had a few TV roles in the 1960s. Her last credited movie appearance was in Pulp, a 1972 sendup of film noir.

Scott lived quietly in Hollywood, sometimes accepting invitations to attend film festivals and other events. She said in the Langer interview, “I loved making films. There was something about that lens that I adored, and it adored me back. So, we were a great combination”. Scott’s survivors include her brother Gus Matzo of Plymouth MI and sister Justine Birdsall of Middletown NY.

6 February 2015

David Colker

Los Angeles Times

http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-lizabeth-scott-20150206-story.html

Wednesday, 12 June 2013

12 June 2013. Sergei Yolkin’s World. The News of the Week in Cartoons: 20 – 24 May 2013

00 Sergei Yolkin. The News of the Week in Cartoons

The News of the Week in Cartoons: 20 – 24 May 2013

Sergei Yolkin

2013

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Sergei Yolkin noted both the unexpected and the welcome guests of the week: Steven Seagal visited Ramzan Kadyrov , wasps and mosquitoes tormented Moscovites, and Georgian wine returned to Russian store-shelves.

24 May 2013

Sergei Yolkin

RIA-Novosti

http://ria.ru/caricature/20130524/939261269.html

 

Sunday, 14 October 2012

Oscar Winners to Promote Orthodoxy in Russia

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The Buranovskie Babushki are mentioned below, here’s their Party for Everybody… if that ain’t Orthodox, I don’t know what it is (it’s NOT “Party for the Chosen and Affluent Few”).

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The Orthodox movement Soboryane said that it plans to show posters all over Russia promoting Orthodoxy depicting Hollywood star Tom Hanks. Andrei Vorontsov, the movement’s chairman, said that posters depicting famous people, including two Oscar winners, the Forrest Gump star and Russian film director Nikita Mikhalkov, amongst others, with quotes about Orthodoxy, would appear ahead of a major religious holyday. Vorontsov said that they’ve carried out a pilot campaign in Stavropol, the capital of the southern Stavropol Krai, which was beset by conflicts between ethnic Russians and indigenous people from the neighbouring Caucasus.

The “We are Orthodox” campaign inspired Orthodox activists in 25 other oblasts, which have similar events in their hometowns, Vorontsov said. Komsomolskaya Pravda quoted him as saying, “Activists will place posters or banners… depending on how much money that they have”. One can see samples of the campaign’s posters, featuring ESC stars Buranovskie Babushki and the 19th century writer Fyodor Dostoyevsky, amongst others, on Soboryane’s page on vKontakte, Russia’s most popular social network site. Members of the movement were asked to submit their favourite quotes of famous people for the campaign, according to vKontakte’s official page, which has over 4,000 subscribers. Vorontsov told The Moscow News, “We’re in process of negotiating with the people we want to participate in the campaign. We hope that Tom Hanks will agree to take part in it”.

Hanks, who converted to Greek Orthodoxy on marrying actress and producer Rita Wilson in 1988, is cited in Russian as saying that he realises the importance of attending church services and the questions posed by Orthodoxy. One of the posters also features an image of Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, with the quote, “If you haven’t met God on earth, you won’t find him in space”. Given the difficult relationship the Soviet establishment had with religion, his words could well likely reflect atheist views as much as Orthodox ones. However, Vorontsov said that Church spokesman Fr Vsevolod Chaplin, best known for his controversial views, endorsed the campaign. He also told KP that Orthodox activists in the Ukraine and Belarus contacted the Soboryane movement in order to stage similar events in their countries.

10 August 2012

Alina Lobzina

The Moscow News

http://themoscownews.com/russia/20121008/190331270.html

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