Voices from Russia

Sunday, 21 February 2016

21 February 2016. Time-Lapse Iconography from Syria

01 Christ Not Made By Hands. 14 c

Christ “Not-Made-By-Hands”

Unknown Artist

14th century

Russian

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This time-lapse vid from Syria gives you the painting of Christ “Not-Made-By-Hands” in about two minutes…

BMD

Wednesday, 8 May 2013

Russian Icons at Knights of Columbus Museum

00 Unknown Artist. Mother of God 'of Konevskaya'. 19th century Russian.

Mother of God “of Konevskaya”

Unknown Artist

19th century

Russian

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Orthodox Christians revere Russian icons as sacred devotional pieces. However, to others around the world, they’re magnificent treasures, collected and cherished for their beauty, artistry, and history. Simply put, the appeal of Russian icons is international, extending beyond religious or ethnic background. With this in mind, the museum at Knights of Columbus International Headquarters in New Haven CT (where the organisation was founded) is presenting Windows into Heaven: Russian Icons and Treasures, which will run for more than a year… through 27 April 2014. The exhibition opened in time for Orthodox Easter on Sunday, 5 May. Many Orthodox Christian churches, including the Greek Orthodox and Russian Orthodox churches, celebrate Easter Sunday based on the Julian calendar.

The exhibition features about 325 icons and liturgical pieces, most of which are on loan from a private collector who requested to remain anonymous. A few pieces are from the museum’s permanent collection. Museum Curator Mary Lou Cummings said the exhibition is visually stunning, no matter how one views iconography. The exhibition points out that iconographic customs have endured for more than a millennium and that they “offer a story of spirituality, tradition and cultures, shaped by the triumphs and struggle of Russian Christians through their country’s 12 centuries”, according to information provided in the exhibition.

The museum said in a statement, “Orthodox Christianity, adopted from the Byzantine Empire (sic) in Constantinople (now Istanbul), was instituted as the state religion in Kiev by Prince Vladimir in 988 AD, and spread across all of Russia. One of the most important elements of the Orthodox faith that followed from Constantinople was the sacred art of iconography. These highly-venerated images spread across Russia … fostering religious understanding and devotion among the people of Kievan Rus in the present-day Ukraine, Belarus, and northwest Russia … with nearly every home having a sacred (or prayer) corner containing one or more icons. … Iconographers historically prayed or fasted before and during the creation of an icon”.

According to the exhibition’s introductory text, Prayer to, and veneration of, icons “was understood to be an encounter with God, His saints, and angels”. Cummings added that Orthodox Christians consider icons as conduits for prayers or “windows into heaven” and they “aren’t created to be artwork”. She said that many of the icons on view are centuries old, thus, predating the Bolshevik Revolution of the early 20th century.

Supreme Knight Carl Anderson said, “Icons have been synonymous with Christian prayer and practice for centuries. One of the great traditions of Eastern Christianity, icons are less-well-known here, and we’re pleased that this exhibit will enable residents of the Northeast to grow in their understanding of the history and religious significance of these windows into heaven”. According to the museum, “Traditionally, icons were painted in egg tempera on wood and often accented with gold-leaf or covered with ornately-gilt metal covers called rizas. Rich in symbolism, they’re still used extensively in Orthodox churches and monasteries, and many Russian homes have icons hanging on the wall in a ‘Beautiful (or prayer) Corner’. Today, Russian Orthodox icons are renowned throughout the world”. Cummings said that the exhibition has four distinct sections, each devoted to specific icons:

IF YOU GO

Knights of Columbus Museum, 1 State St, New Haven CT. Open daily from 10.00 to 17.00, admission and parking are free. Call (203) 865 0400 or visit kofcmuseum.org.

2 May 2013

Phyllis A S Boros

Connecticut Post

http://www.ctpost.com/news/article/Russian-icons-at-Knights-of-Columbus-Museum-4463575.php#ixzz2S8ppOurm

Wednesday, 20 June 2012

Archpriest Vsevolod Chaplin is Organising Exhibition of Works by Contemporary Russian Artists

The Breathing of a Soul

(from the cycle, Conversations with the Guardian Angel)

Inna Myalo

2009

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Palm Sunday

Dmitri Kostylyov

2000s

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The parish of St Nicholas on the Three Hills in Moscow, whose rector is the head of the MP Department for Church and Society, Archpriest Vsevolod Chaplin, will hold an exhibition of paintings by contemporary artists. His contribution to this show, funded by the Вольное дело (Volnoye delo: Free Affairs) Foundation and RUSAL, was ten paintings on Christian themes in a series entitled, Conversation with the Guardian Angel, by Inna Myalo, a member of the Union of Artists Union the Ukraine. In his acceptance of the paintings, Fr Vsevolod thanked the Foundation (and its founder Oleg Deripaska) for their fruitful cooperation. He said that, only to speak of recent events, cooperation from this source allowed the parish to start repairs on their Sunday school building and proceed with plans to create their own spiritual and educational centre. Currently, the attached buildings to the church are being renovated, in the autumn, there will be the exhibition of paintings by contemporary Russian artists , besides which there’ll be various other activities, including community organisations and clubs, under the aegis of the MP Department of Church and Society. Earlier, in a part of the basement of the church, the parish opened a concert and exhibition centre, which is the location of Club ArtEria. The club regularly holds concerts and exhibitions there.

20 June 2012

Interfax-Religion

http://www.interfax-religion.ru/?act=news&div=46017

Editor’s Note:

Here’s an interesting wrinkle about the ArtEria club… one of the supporters of the initiative is Marat Gelman… Fr Vsevolod’s opponent in the Forbidden Art controversy (here and here). Hmm… could that mean that Gelman’s attempting to mend fences with HH? Ya never know…

Tuesday, 20 September 2011

“Modus Ars, Modus Orendi… Lex Orendi, Lex Crendendi”… “The Manner of Art Determines the Manner of Prayer… The Rule of Prayer Stipulates the Rule of Belief”

Editor’s Foreword:

I’ve been researching mosaics for one of my art sites… some of what I saw in the course of my exploration were some of the most vile “penny dreadful” works that I’ve ever seen. Let me illustrate it for you, but, first, let’s look at some legit iconography

BMD

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Christ Enthroned as Heavenly King

Unknown Artist

undated

National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Washington DC USA

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This is Class A Top Shelf Iconography… beautiful art promotes heartfelt prayer which leads to sound belief… this IS Christ enthroned in judgement.

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Pentecost

Mary Reardon

Post-Vatican II

Cathedral Basilica of St Louis

St Louis MO USA

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This is post-Second Vatican Council Grade Z daubing pretending to be art. It wouldn’t be so bad in a tatty modernistic building… it’d be “in place” and in sync with its surroundings (it’d be just as bad… it just wouldn’t be in such obvious conflict with its setting). It’s out of its element here, especially with the mosaics surrounding it, which are in traditional style… the clash of styles is just TOO MUCH.

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Christ Enthroned as Heavenly King

Unknown Artist

undated

Cathedral Basilica of St Louis

St Louis MO USA

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Compare the above “icon” with this earlier image in the narthex. You wouldn’t know that it was a symbol of the same religion! One breathes the air of Christian antiquity… the other looks as though some bored suburban housewife ran it up in her hubby’s garage. It looks like something slapped on a banner at the Antioch Baptist Church or the Fire Baptised Dipped Thrice in the Spirit Pentecostal Chapel and Auto Body Shop (or, sadly enough, in any RC parish still run by a VII liturgical experimenter… there’s still a few of ‘em left, I’m told). Now, look at the image below (you can do it… hold your nose… see, I told ya so…)… what a contrast!

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Resurrection of Our Lord and Saviour Christ

Unknown Artist

undated

Cathedral Basilica of St Louis

St Louis MO USA

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The Reardon Pentecost “icon” was tacky and uninspired… but this one’s downright BAD… no, it’s ugly, pointless, and SHITTY. What’s worse, it doesn’t go at all with the images on the lintel of the apse, which are in the style of Santa Maria Assunta in Torcello (that is pre-10th century New Roman). Late-20th century minimalism doesn’t “marry” well with Constantinopolitan New Roman exuberance and floridity. If this isn’t proof that Vatican II warped perspirin’ minds, nothing’ll turn the trick, I’m afraid. Of course, all the pseudo-intellectuals in the so-called “liturgical movement” were floating their awful fancies in the ‘50s… unfortunately, VII gave many of them the opportunity to (literally) vandalise and deface many a church with hideous dreck such as this. “Rabboni”… don’t you just hear the Jerusalem Bible coming at you… “Yahweh” and all that, dontcha know…

I’m pointing no fingers… some of our people were just as bad. Schmemann was just as repulsive (look at the horrid “peek-a-boo” iconostas at SVS… you’ll know what I mean). Tom Hopko went to Fordham at the height of the so-called Risorgimento, and all the pseudo-intellectuals are still defensive about it (“He wasn’t affected by that”)… don’t argue with them… it’s pointless, as they change their minds weekly, and wipe their memories clean of last week’s adamantly-held position. It’s like trying to get one’s hands on smoke… you can’t do it. Spare yourself… let them burble on… but don’t let them bamboozle good souls. Shut them up in their ivory towers, well away from real life… that’s the ticket. Let them write books and monographs that no one reads… it keeps them out of trouble. A correspondent wrote me:

In fact, some of our arch-modernist clergy said that a “Pan-Orthodox Council” was “inevitable”, because “the Roman Catholics and Anglicans had already made reforms in the ‘60s”. Therefore, Orthodox should do the same and make similar modernist reforms, draining the Church of all spiritual content… the modernists wanted to impose their authoritarianism. Fifty years after the modernism of the Second Vatican Council and the wholesale secularisation adopted by Anglicanism and other Protestant denominations, were they right? In reality, this view simply reflected a quaint myth, which one still hears, that the Church is just a backward and exotic version of Roman Catholicism, which is just a old-fashioned and odd form of Protestantism, which,  in turn, is just a archaic and weird variety of triumphant Western liberal secularism. What conceit! In reality, that’s wrong, not only because liberal secularism has utterly failed, but also because although the Church is in the world, it isn’t of the world, because the Church doesn’t become like the world, but the world becomes like the Church, because the Church isn’t our plaything… it’s of God.  

Now, that’s something that I wish that I’d written…

The Church isn’t our plaything… it’s of God.

THAT’S the truth, kids… that’s why we shouldn’t bring crappy offerings to God… He didn’t stint on us, did He? That’s why to lie “for the good of the Church” is one of the vilest and most noisome flowers of evil… ponder that. You don’t bring Untruth to the Maker of Truth… what does that tell us about the True God of such people (ye cannot worship both God and Mammon…)? Scary meditation, isn’t it?

Barbara-Marie Drezhlo

Tuesday 20 September 2011

Albany NY

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