Voices from Russia

Tuesday, 16 January 2018

Experts Say FIFA World Cup Will Bolster Russian Beer Market

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Data provided by Morgan Stanley showed that the upcoming 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia this summer would boost beer consumption. It estimated football fans’ impact on beer consumption at 2 percent. As a result, it expects that Russia’s beer market would grow during 2018, for the first time in a decade. The Russian Brewers’ Union confirmed that beer sales in Russia, which declined steadily over the past few years, could indeed grow in 2018. Kirill Bolmatov, Corporate Relations Director at Heineken Russia said:

To begin with, there’s no bad news. The excise duty didn’t rise in 2018, nor were there any new restrictions. Non-alcoholic beer made a substantial contribution, which is the most promising segment now.

According to the Russian Brewers’ Union, despite a decrease in beer consumption, sales of non-alcoholic beer grew by 5.6 percent from January to September 2017. Oraz Durdyev, Legal and Corporate Affairs Director at SUN InBev, a subsidiary of Anheuser-Busch InBev, pointed up:

Football can be of help as well. As a rule, during World Cups, beer consumption in a host country grows by about 5 percent. Largely, this is due to the established consumption culture in Western countries, because beer is always associated with football.

Pavel Filippov, PR manager at Efes Rus said:

In addition to that, the event will be in the summer, which is the peak season for brewers.

11 January 2018

TASS

http://tass.com/pressreview/984567

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Monday, 15 January 2018

Mining Town of Snezhnoe Greeted the Old New Year with an Agricultural Market

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Today, residents of the mining town of Snezhnoe in the eastern DNR replenished their stock of New Year’s goodies at an agricultural market that honoured the Old New Year. Ella Gorvat, head of the department of trade, consumer services, and consumer protection in the Snezhnoe GGA*, told us:

  • GGA: Municipal State Authority

We invited several major food and processing enterprises to participate in the Old New Year agricultural market. They included the Shakhtersk Poultry Farm, Snezhnoe Sausage Shop, the Marinovka and Dmitrovka village farms, and individual entrepreneurs. In total, more than a dozen local enterprises and farms presented their products at the market. After we held a Christmas Market in the city, this is our first “Weekend Market”.

Last year, 53 such markets took place in Snezhnoe. Notably, not only local processors and farms, but also enterprises from Donetsk, Amvrosievka, Gorlovka, Yenakiyevo, and other cities and districts of the DNR took part. The frosts that hit the Donbass today didn’t bother the market participants in Snezhnoe. They supplied milk, sausages, vegetables, and chickens… more than 100 items. By tradition, prices at the market were below usual retail level.

14 January 2018

DAN Donetsk News Agency

https://dan-news.info/obschestvo/shaxterskij-gorod-snezhnoe-vstretil-staryj-novyj-god-selskoxozyajstvennoj-yarmarkoj.html

Editor:

People in the DNR have enough to eat… people in American-occupied Banderstan don’t. Fancy that. Note that starving people don’t move the Anglos and their Uniate running-dogs. Tells you much about them…

BMD

Tuesday, 13 December 2016

FAO Sez Russia is Now Major Actor on Global Agriculture Markets

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UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Director-General José Graziano da Silva told RIA Novosti:

Russia made significant progress in the agriculture sector; it’s now an important player on global agricultural markets. It’s poised to become the biggest global wheat exporter in 2016/17. Further, our understanding is that forecasts show that Russia’s total cereal production in 2016 will reach record levels. Russia was one of the most important partners of FAO, significantly contributing to global nutrition security. The [Russian-FAO] coöperation revolves around knowledge exchange and provision of technical assistance to developing countries in ensuring food security, food safety, nutrition, and in tackling transnational animal and plant diseases. FAO is also very much interested in attracting Russian expertise to its forestry, fisheries, land/water management, and soil programmes.

Russia provided 6 million USD (366 million Roubles. 41.4 million Renminbi. 405.6 million INR. 7.878 million CAD. 8.028 million AUD. 5.658 million Euros. 4.728 million UK Pounds) to FAO to implement a food and nutrition security project in Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan. Russia is also interested in allocating money for a FAO project for the progressive control of foot-and-mouth disease in the same region. In 2015, during my official visit to the Russian Federation, we signed a 1 million USD (61 million Roubles. 6.9 million Renminbi. 67.6 million INR. 1.313 million CAD. 1.338 million AUD. 943,000 Euros. 788,000 UK Pounds) coöperation agreement to support the Global Soil Partnership. I also hope that FAO and Russia would boost coöperation to support FAO work in post-disaster and emergency situations across the globe. The international community can achieve the ambitious goal of eradicating hunger by 2030. We aren’t talking about simply halving hunger’s scope or reducing the absolute numbers of hungry people… we’re talking about really ending hunger by 2030, and providing healthy sustainable diets to all. This is a bold goal, but we’re convinced that it’s indeed viable and affordable. We can and we must be the Zero Hunger generation.

The struggle against hunger requires multiple efforts in many spheres. The UN’s 17 sustainable development goals, including elimination of hunger and poverty, as well ensuring quality education, are part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development adopted by the UN General Assembly on 25 September 2015. The instability and various conflicts around the world have a negative impact on the issue of global food security, as well as social protection capabilities. Conflict is one of the main… if not the main… drivers of food insecurity and malnutrition. It reduces food availability, disrupts access to food and health care, interrupts food production and agriculture, and undermines social protection systems. Indeed, conflict characterised every famine in the modern era. Some 80 percent of humanitarian funding appeals had links to conflicts, adding that over 56 million people affected by protracted crises were in an emergency level of food insecurity. The FAO exerts efforts to promote stability and food security in conflict-ridden countries such as Nigeria, which deals with the Boko Haram insurgency.

13 December 2016

Sputnik International

https://sputniknews.com/russia/201612131048482533-russia-agriculture-markets/

Sunday, 23 October 2016

Cash-Strapped Ukrainians Buy Expired Food Following Economic “Experiment”

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The Ukrainian news website Vesti reported that since the Ukrainian economic crisis in Ukraine shows no sign of improvement, the past few weeks saw more and more ordinary people buy expired food products. On 1 October, the Ukrainian Cabinet of Ministers temporarily abolished state regulation of prices for food products, which the authorities claim is an experiment allegedly aimed at helping them find out more about the effectiveness and feasibility of price controls. The government decided to scrap the maximum trade mark-up, which ranged between 10 and 15 percent, for goods deemed socially important. The measure will remain in force until 31 December. It means that, until the end of the year, entrepreneurs are free to hike the prices of staple goods including bread, milk, butter, eggs, sugar, pasta, and many other products. the Russian news website Lenta.ru reported that Ukrainians rushed to buy expired food, including milk, sausage, cheese, and croissants, to save money, enticed by smooth operators on the internet. Lenta.ru quoted an unnamed seller from Kremenchug as saying:

I’m selling expired sausages, frankfurters, and wieners. Pay attention to the fact that the products aren’t spoiled.

Prices for such food are cheaper than they are for fresh products, with businessmen preferring to sell expired food at urban markets and even spontaneously formed selling points. Lenta.ru also quoted Maksim Nesmiyanov, the head of the Ukraine’s Union of Consumers, as saying that milk products and ketchup are a dime a dozen at the marketplaces, where they’re mostly purchased by pensioners. Meanwhile, according to statistics, food prices in the Ukraine increased by about 10 percent since the beginning of this year, whilst the population’s purchasing power tumbled 20 percent within the same period.

23 October 2016

Sputnik International

https://sputniknews.com/europe/201610231046637278-ukraine-crisis-expired-food/

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