Voices from Russia

Wednesday, 22 April 2015

DNR Self-Sufficient in Electricity… Not Dependent on the Ukraine or Russia

00 electric shock. 22.04.15

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Today, Yelena Styazhkina, Director of the Department of Electricity of the DNR Ministry of Coal and Energy, announced at a press conference in Donetsk that the Republic has complete self-sufficiency in electricity, saying, “At present, the DNR doesn’t buy electricity from the Ukraine, even less so from the Russian Federation. The Starobeshevo and Zuevskaya thermal power plants (TES) produce enough electricity for the purposes of the DNR. Every hour, the four units in these two TESs generate about 1,000 MW/hour of electricity. This quantity is enough to cover all the needs of the population and enterprises in the country”.

21 April 2015

DAN Donetsk News Agency

http://dan-news.info/ukraine/dnr-obespechivaet-stranu-sobstvennoj-elektroenergiej-i-ne-pokupaet-ee-na-ukraine-ili-v-rf.html

Saturday, 20 September 2014

Largest Power Generation Station in Kiev Oblast Almost Out of Coal

00 coal. 20.09.14

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Tripolskaya TES is on the banks of the Dnepr, 45 kilometres (28 miles) south of Kiev, near the village of Tripolye. After the decommissioning of the Chernobyl AES, Tripolskaya, with an installed capacity of 1,800 MW, is the largest power generating facility in Kiev Oblast, producing electricity for consumers in Kiev, Zhitomir, and Cherkassy Oblasts. However, a more important function of the facility is that it regulates the daily consumption of electricity, making sure that there isn’t any interruption during peak periods in the morning and evening consumption. However, it’s nearly out of coal supplies, they’ve bulldozed sand mixed with coal dust and coal fragments. Alternative energy sources in the region if Tripolskaya shuts down are Kiev TETs-5 and TETs-6, 700 MW and 500 MW, respectively, and Darnitskaya TETs, 160 MW, in Kiev. All these TETs use natural gas, providing, in addition to electricity, hot water and heating to residential districts in Kiev. Reserve fuel for Tipolskaya is either oil or natural gas, in normal operation, such fuel ramps up the coal-fired boilers. However, as Vitaly Klichko said, “To turn cold water into hot, we need to warm it up, and for this we need gas. We need gas, but no one’s giving us any”. Winter’s near, but there’s no coal, and there’s not enough time to get any more.

20 September 2014

Novorusinform

http://www.novorosinform.org/news/id/9451

Monday, 8 September 2014

If Junta Blocks Electricity to the Crimea… Russia will Block Electricity to the Ukraine

YUGOSLAVIA BELGRADE

A Serb mother and child hiding from American bombing… the Russians wouldn’t bomb the loudmouthed Uniates… they’d just shut off the juice. Anyway, those kholkhols don’t want anything from us Moskali, anyway…

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Editor:

For 23 years, the Uniate bastards have leached off Russia whilst calling us every vile name in the book. I say, “Let them find out what life without Russia is like”. I guarantee that the junta wouldn’t last a week and that the normal people would cheer when the Russian troops entered town, turning back on the power, and giving them proper bread. It’s time to get serious with these lying sacks of shit.

Remember the dead of the Dom Profsoyuzov… may my right hand wither if I forget…

BMD

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Ukrainian Oblasts that may lose electricity from Russia (fully or partly):

  • Sumy
  • Kharkov
  • Chernigov
  • Kiev
  • Poltava
  • Kirovograd
  • Dnepropetrovsk

Here’s a brief synopsis of how it all works. The Soviets built the Russian and Ukrainian electrical systems on the principle of substitution; we still use the same method today. For example, take the Zaporozhe NPP (a middling unit in capacity) and the Kursk NPP (a behemoth, one of the most powerful in Europe). From both stations, lines diverge across the Ukraine and Russia. If Zaporozhe isn’t up to the load, electricity comes to the Ukraine from Kursk. If something happens in Russia, along the same lines, electricity comes from the Ukraine. Roughly, that’s how a reciprocal system works. Thus, no matter what happens, there’ll always be electricity. However, after the American occupation of the Ukraine after the putsch in February, these differences vastly shifted, throwing more load on the Russian side. In the Ukraine, as you know, there are now burgeoning electricity shortages. If Russia blocks the electrical supply from Rostov, Kursk, and Novovoronezh, 30-40 percent of the Ukraine will be without electricity. Winter’s coming… so, whilst you have the chance, someone, please, cut off the supply of hard drugs to the Ukrainian government.

8 September 2014

Novorusinform

http://www.novorosinform.org/news/id/8195

Tuesday, 2 September 2014

The Ukraine Will Cut Electricity in the Evening

00 Winter 2015. Those Moskali aren't freezing-26-06-14.jpg

Winter 2015: Those Moskali aren’t freezing!

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The Ukrainian Ministry of Energy will cut electricity in the evening to save resources. The Ministry said that regional energy supply companies reported that temporary shutoffs of power supply to the population would occur due to a shortage of fuel and water resources in the united Ukrainian energy grid system. The Ministry would impose so-called graphics emergency blackouts to conserve fuel to comply with a joint decision of the National Ukrainian Energy Company (Ukrenergo) and the government. Tentatively, such shutdowns would occur during the morning and evening peak periods, at about 09.00-11.00 and 20.00-22.00. Most likely, each area will set its own limits for shutoffs. Earlier, on 4 August, Kievenergo cut off the hot water throughout the city as an economy measure. On 1 September, hot water will be on in kindergartens, hospitals, and schools. Supposedly, the hot water shutoff was to save resources for the heating season, which begins on 15 October.

1 September 2014

LifeNews

http://lifenews.ru/news/139515

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