Voices from Russia

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

7 March 2017. D V Davydov on Great Russia

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Click here for a bio of D V Davydov, a soldier-poet of the Patriotic War of 1812 period. Until his death, Denis Vasilyevich retained an amazingly young heart and character. His cheerfulness was contagious and he was an exciting person to be around; in intimate conversation, he embodied cordial friendship.

BMD

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Tuesday, 12 August 2014

12 August 2014. A Point to Ponder…

00 There'll Always be a Russia. 12.08.14

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The West either cowers in fear of Russia or it thunders forth in bombastic disdain of it. Neither is healthy, truly… Russians aren’t ogres… they aren’t angels in the flesh, either. Russians are happy sinful-ginfuls, full of the love of life, hardworking, and mindful of what’s really real. That means that they don’t put stock in some of the same things as the West does… Russians are feisty and ornery, and INSIST on going their own way. The West should butt out of Holy Rus’ affairs… it’s none of their concern. Russia (and all of its Russian World) wants to be friends with all decent people. We want peace and amity… but we’ll put all those who march on Russia with a sword to the sword… reflect on that, if you will. It seems that Washington has forgotten that…

BMD

Monday, 4 March 2013

4 March 2013. Some of My Favourite Things… Svetilen Sings Again… and the Voronezhskie Devchata

00 Svetilen. Old Russian music. 04.03.13

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00 Voronezhskie Devchata. 04.03.13

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Svetilen specialises in singing medieval Russian spiritual songs. Na Iordane is an interesting mixture of Russian vocal technique with an instrumental accompaniment that’s redolent of Western Early Music. The second is an Old Russian song that’s been hijacked by Galician Uniates (usually, in very bad Westernised and bowdlerised versions)… do mistrust all “Ukrainian” nationalist claims… this song has Byelorussian roots, for instance. Svetilen has been around since 1989, keeping alive the Old Russian singing tradition. Like many good things, it started in Soviet times (just as many bad things, such as the oligarchs and buccaneer crapitalism came in after the Soviets fell). They take from both sources of spiritual singing… the Church and the folk tradition. They use Old Russian instruments and perform in Old Russian garb. They’ve had tremendous achievements on stage in France in 2001, in Austria and Czechia in 2003, and in Serbia (Belgrade) in 2004. Enjoy the sounds of the ancient Orthodox Russia.

The Voronezhskie Devchata (Voronezh Girls) are NOT “Ukrainian” (Voronezh is in Great Russia proper), despite internet propaganda to the contrary. As you can hear and see, so-called “Ukrainian” usages aren’t unique; they’re part of the Greater Russian culture. Always suspect “Ukrainian” loudmouths… most are Uniate imposters, with no real roots in Great Russia (most real Ukrainians readily admit their ties to Russia… keep that in mind). The ensemble was founded by Konstantin Iraklievich Massalitin, People’s Artist of the USSR (of Jewish descent), in 1966. Over the years, this ensemble won many international, all-Union, and all-Russian competitions, widely-known in Russia and in many other countries, too. The repertoire of the ensemble centres around Russian lyrical song in all its variety.

BMD

 

Sunday, 4 November 2012

Ruling Party of Regions Wins Ukrainian Election – 99.84% of Votes Counted

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On Saturday, the Ukrainian Central Election Commission said that the ruling Party of Regions won 29.99 percent of the party list vote with 99.84 percent of the ballots counted after the election for seats to the Verkhovna Rada. The Batykivshchina (Fatherland) Party led by jailed former Prime Minister Yuliya Timoshenko came in second with 25.53 percent, and former boxing champion Vitaly Klichko’s Udar (Punch) Party came in third with 13.95 percent. The Communist Party of the Ukraine (KPU) came in fourth with 13.18 percent, and the nationalist Svoboda party gained 10.44 percent. The remaining parties didn’t get past the 5 percent minimum threshold to enter parliament.

The Party of Regions also won the constituency district vote. The election took place on 28 October, with a mixed vote system. Half of the Rada deputies are chosen from party lists on a proportional representation vote, and the other half stand for election in discrete constituencies. The Ukrainian Central Election Commission will announce a final vote tally, with all ballots counted, on Monday at 11.00 local time (13.00 MSK 09.00 UTC 04.00 EST 01.00 PST 17.00 AEST). So far, the Central Election Commission has accepted all the ballots from 188 of 225 regional election commissions. OSCE monitors said the election was not sufficiently transparent and noted an imbalance in the use of administrative resources in the course of the election as well as a disparity in access to media resources among the contending parties. Earlier on Saturday, the EU’s High Representative for Foreign Affairs, Catherine Ashton, criticised the Ukraine for not having a result declared for the election five days after the vote.

3 November 2012

RIA-Novosti

http://en.rian.ru/world/20121103/177177791.html

Editor’s Note:

For those who are interested, the following table shows the proportion of the vote gained by the various major factions in the last three elections (must have won at least 5 percent in one election, bold type indicates a gain in votes over the last election):

  2012 2007 2006 2002
1. Party of Regions

30.0

34.4 32.1

11.8

2. Fatherland

25.5

30.7 22.3

7.3

3. Udar

14.0

—- —- —-

4. KPU

13.2

5.4 3.7

20.0

5. Svoboda

10.4

0.8 0.4  —-

6. Our Ukraine

—-

14.2 14.0

23.6

7. Ukrainian Socialist

N/A

2.9 5.7

6.9

8. United Social Democrats

—- —- 1.0

6.2

The above vote led to the following allocations of seats in the Rada (bold type indicates a gain in seats):

  2012 2007 2006 2002
1. Party of Regions

187

175 186

101

2. Fatherland

103

156 129

22

3. Udar

40

—- —-

—-

4. KPU

32

27 21

65

5. Svoboda

37

—- —-

—-

6. Our Ukraine

—-

72 81

112

7. Ukr Socialist

—-

—- 33

23

8. United Soc Dem

—-

—- —-

24

The Our Ukraine (the Yushchenko gang) bloc has imploded. The two minor Socialist parties have fallen off the map, too. Fatherland (Timoshenko’s bunch) appears to have peaked, and is on the downturn. The Party of Regions is holding its own, and the KPU is coming back from a disastrous collapse in 2006. What’s worrisome is the rise of Svoboda and Udar, but there were 72 Yushchenko deputies in 2007 and 77 Svoboda/Udar deputies in 2012. It looks like the Yushchenko voters went for the two extreme right parties, actually diluting their influence. It shows you the level of intelligence amongst the rightwing… namely, not much. In short, not much change.

If one counts the Regions/KPU deputies together, one comes up with the following total of pro-Russian deputies:

  Rada deputies
2012

219

2007

202

2006

207

2002

166

That is, these two pro-Russian parties have 30 percent more seats than in 2002… that doesn’t bode well for the Galician nationalists, which is why they probably bolted from Yushchenko’s faction and cast their lot with the Far Right Svoboda. This probably means that a Ukrainian rapprochement with Russia is on the way in the middle-future (five to ten years down the road). America’s great attempt to weaken Great Russia by wresting away the Ukraine has probably failed. Sic semper tyrannis

BMD 

 

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