Voices from Russia

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Official Declaration of the Malorossiyan Federation (Full Text)

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Editor:

A friend was kind enough to send me the Russian text and I based this translation on that.

BMD

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Political Declaration

The project of a “Ukrainian” state formulated 150 years ago and embodied in different forms during the 20th century has reached its logical conclusion. This led to the country’s disintegration, a civil war, and the death of thousands of people, including elderly people, women, and children. Moreover, this process is irreversible. An attempt to turn the clock back would only result in a “Balkanisation” of the conflict, an expansion of the chaos, and an escalation in the civil war, which would lead to even more casualties. To stop the civil war and to avoid creating new victims, we, representatives from all over the former “Ukraine” assembled in Donetsk on 18 July 2017, discussed the current situation, and came to the following conclusions:

  • The “Ukrainian” state is a failed state incapable of granting its people a peaceful and prosperous present and future
  • The current authorities (including “President” Poroshenko and the Verkhovnaya Rada) in Kiev are illegitimate, as they were elected after the coup d’état against a backdrop of political terror and the absence of elections in the Crimea and Donbass
  • The “Ukrainian” state is on the brink of economic catastrophe and depopulation
  • An ultranationalist coup is brewing in Kiev, through which outright neo-Nazis would come to power instead of the present “Banderovtsy with a European face”
  • The coming neo-Nazi coup would bring a civil war of “all against all” and cause a disintegration of the “Ukrainian” state
  • The “Ukrainian” nationalist project (the Galician one) discredited itself by shedding innocent blood
  • The “Ukrainian” ideology is misanthropic, a mixture of xenophobia (Russophobic, anti-Semitic, and anti-Polish sentiments) and neo-Nazism (an ideology of national exclusivity and superiority)
  • History shows that the word “Ukraine” is forever associated with the names of Nazi accomplices such as Bandera and Shukhevich, it has links with the tragedies of Babi Yar, the Volyn Massacre, and Khatyn, and with contemporary tragedies such as the murders on the Maidan and at the Dom Profsoyuzov in Odessa and the present genocide against the Donbass people

Based on the above, we believe that the “Ukrainian” state in the form established after the collapse of the USSR is UNVIABLE. We, representatives from all over the former “Ukraine”, propose to re-establish state authority by establishing the state of MALOROSSIYA on the ruins of the former “Ukraine”. In this case, it’s of crucial importance to rename the country, since the “Ukraine” as a state is guilty of war crimes, mass terror, and genocide of its own people. In turn, renaming the country based on historical precedents would enable us to reunify those pieces of the former “Ukraine” that seemed to have parted ways forever, including those who fought in the civil war on different sides of the front line. We must turn this page of our people’s history, one flooded with the blood of our brothers and sisters.

Malorossiya is an INDEPENDENT and SOVEREIGN state with a new name, a new flag, a new constitution, a new state structure, new principles of social and economic development, and new historical perspectives. However, this is NOT A REVOLUTION! It’s only a return to the path of real history. This is a path of restoration, not destruction. In view of the economic plight of the country, the potential for chaos and disintegration, and the possibility of a “war of all against all”, we consider that it’d be necessary to declare a state of emergency for a transition period of up to three years. During this time, we’d complete agreement on a new Constitution and establish the rule of law.

Under such a state of emergency, we’d have to ban the activities of political parties and foreign agencies and increase penalties for criminal offences, especially against people. We’d have to step up the fight against corruption, as well as augment penalties for it. We must eliminate the shadow arms market, including registering weapons in accordance with new laws. In the same period, foreign specialists from Russia, Belarus, and the EU would carry out an investigation into the crimes committed by the current Kiev régime including the murders on the Maidan, the murders at the Odessa Dom Profsoyuzov on 2 May 2014, and the war crimes in Donbass during the so-called ATO. Besides this, the People’s Tribunal should charge the state authorities who led the country to disintegration and civil war… Yanukovich (with a request to Russia for his extradition), Poroshenko and his clique, Turchinov, Yatsenyuk, Kolomoisky, Paruby, Nalivaichenko, and others. We are sure that after we recover from the criminal neo-Nazi “Ukrainian” ideology, we’d be able to build a new society based on friendship and mutual assistance, not hatred and envy. The creative genius of our people would bring Malorossiya to the forefront of global civilisation so that it could play its proper role in history… a role rooted in Honour and Truth.

18 July 2017

DONi Donbass News Agency

https://dninews.com/article/official-declaration-malorossiyan-federation-full-text-07182017

Thursday, 4 May 2017

Five Reasons Why the Ukraine Is a Bigger Threat to Peace and Safety than the DPRK Is

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It doesn’t fit the western narrative, but the Ukraine is a far bigger threat to its own people and its neighbours than the DPRK is or has been for decades.  Often, people think of the Korean Peninsula as a volatile region, a dangerous region, an unpredictable “weaponised” region.  In particular, the USA accused the DPRK of being a threat to regional peace and stability.  Objectively, there is some truth to all of this, but the Demilitarised Zone (DMZ) separating the two Korean states is far less unstable than the Syria/Iraq border currently controlled by ISIS.  However, when it comes to threatening regional instability and causing bloodshed, one place is vastly more deadly and volatile than the Korean Peninsula… the battlezone between the fascist Ukraine and the Donbass Peoples Republics.  Despite the fact that the ROK and the DPRK are technically still at war, the region has been remarkably stable and calm since the ceasefire that ended the hot conflict on the peninsula in 1953.  Despite occasional worrying movements on the DMZ separating the two Koreas since 1953, life in the ROK and the DPRK has developed in such a way that all Koreans live their daily lives in a normal way according to the standards that each unique Korean state set for its citizens over the decades since the hot period of the Korean War.  For all of its rhetorical bluster, the DPRK remains technically committed to a “no first strike” policy in respect of nuclear weapons.  Because of this, letting a sleeping dog lie would be good advice for the more hawkish forces in Washington.  Compare that to the Ukraine/Donbass conflict.

1. Duration and Nature of the Conflicts

The Ukraine, a united country between 1991 and 2014 but with deep political divisions, has split.  The DNR and LNR arose after the fascist coup in Kiev.  Since then, regular forces, mercenaries, and terrorists loyal to Kiev invaded and attacked the DNR and LNR, almost without cessation.  This is in total violation of the Minsk II ceasefire agreement, which unlike the successful Korean War ceasefire, was dead on arrival.  The Ukrainian war of aggression against the Donbass Republics started in February 2014 and still rages.  It’s already gone on for longer than the 37 months of the Korean War.  That war lasted between June 1950 and July 1953 before the ceasefire took effect.  Besides this, there were attempted terrorist attacks on neighbouring Russia, attacks thankfully thwarted by Russian security services.  By contrast, the last time the DPRK violated the ceasefire with the ROK was in 1975 when DPRK soldiers committed an “axe murder” of two American soldiers chopping down a tree in the DMZ.  When all was said and done, the USA reacted by chopping down the rest of the tree as a “show of force”.

2. Chemical Weapons 

Whilst no heavy weapons have fired from one Korean state to another since 1953, the Ukraine is guilty of using illegal chemical weapons on civilian targets in the Donbass.  The SK RF concluded that white phosphorus was Kiev’s chemical weapon of choice when attacking the Donbass.

3. Deaths

While death hasn’t been a daily feature of Korean life since 1953, you can’t say the same for the Donbass.  As of December 2016, the UN reported that nearly 10,000 people, including women and children, died in the Donbass conflict, and many suggest the UN figure is low, compared to the even grimmer realities on the ground.  Many more people, including civilians, died since then.  Beyond the deaths, torture and rape, including child rape is a feature of Kiev’s war of aggression.  No such analogue exists in the Korean states.

4. Political Maturity 

Although both Koreas have a goal of uniting the peninsula under their respective flags, so, in turn, don’t acknowledge the political legitimacy of the other state, in reality, both accept the fact that for the foreseeable future they’ll have to live side by side.  Not even the most radical anti-communists in the ROK plan to storm the border in a “war of liberation”, nor will the DPRK turn Seoul into a “sea of flames” unless provoked.  It’s all bombastic rhetoric and has been since the 1950s.  Just as the Federal Republic of Germany and the DDR lived side-by-side without engaging in war, a similar “cold peace” exists between the ROK and the DPRK.

By contrast, the Ukraine is totally confused about its own position on the Donbass Republics.  On the one hand, they claim that the territory is part of a unitary Ukrainian state, but on the other, they cut off water, electricity and other vital supplies to the Republics.  The Ukraine legally removed the rights of Russian speakers throughout the country and purged Russian from Ukrainian media.  The Kiev régime refuses to allow trains from the Donbass into Kiev-controlled regions and they don’t issue passports and birth certificates in the Donbass, which led Russia to accept legal ID issued in the Donbass Republics as legitimate documents.  The Ukraine calls the Donbass people terrorists, “Russian agents”, and everything else to make them as distant as possible.  By contrast, neither Pyongyang nor Seoul challenges the “Korean-ness” of those on the other side of the DMZ.  Just yesterday, President Putin said that Moscow didn’t lure the Donbass Republics into its realm, but rather Kiev simply cut them off, isolated them, alienated them, and pushed them away.  One could add historical inevitability to this list. 

5. The Nuclear Question 

While there are no longer nuclear weapons in the Ukraine, there are many nuclear power facilities and most are in a state of total disrepair.  The Ukrainian nuclear sector is amongst the least safe in the world. The combination of lack of funds and a disorganised central government allowed a situation to develop that could result in another Chernobyl-style disaster.  The Energy Post described the Ukrainian nuclear sector as having “persistent safety problems”.  In an article from 2016, the Energy Post described how the Ukraine’s neighbours live in fear of another nuclear meltdown in the Ukraine:

“The Ukraine’s neighbours are also concerned.  Romania, Slovakia, Hungary, and Austria sent multiple questions for clarification and requests for participation in transboundary consultations.  However, Kiev, in response, denied its obligation to conduct any.  One might think that this experience, or perhaps civil society’s repeated warnings, would make decision makers reconsider this reckless adventure, but not the Ukrainian government”.

While “nuclear war” is a better headline than “nuclear safety concerns”, the fact is that since 1945, the world’s biggest nuclear disasters were the result of poorly managed nuclear power facilities and not nuclear weapons.  In this sense, the Ukraine’s “nuclear problem” is a more dire danger to global safety than the DPRK’s nuclear weapons programme, which thus far has never fired a missile in anger.

Between 2014 and the present day, the Ukraine killed more innocent civilians than either Korean state has even attempted to do since 1953.  The Ukraine breaks ceasefire agreements on a daily basis while the Korean states haven’t.  The Ukraine used chemical weapons on civilians whilst neither Korean state has done so, nor unlike the quiet Korean political conflict, Kiev’s war of aggression is going on at this very moment.  Furthermore, the Ukraine’s silent nuclear problem is manifestly more worrying than the DPRK’s weapons programme.  Objectively, no one could argue that either Korean state is as dangerous or as volatile as post-coup Ukraine.

3 May 2017

Adam Garrie

The Duran

http://theduran.com/5-reasons-why-ukraine-is-a-bigger-threat-to-peace-and-safety-than-north-korea/

Friday, 28 April 2017

Kiev Cut Electricity to LNR… Readies Same Move Against DNR

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Today, the Ukraine cut off supplies of electricity to the LNR. It said that it’s preparing to do the same to the DNR. Supposedly, they decided to do this because of unpaid power bills. In reality, it’s part of the blockade the Ukraine imposed on the two People’s Republics. After some initial disruption, it seems electric power over the LNR is back to normal. This only took a few hours. Supposedly, they did this with domestic resources. Probably, they had technical help from Russia, and possibly even some supply of electricity from Russia, as this article by Deutsche Welle claimed. Indubitably, both the Russians and the two People’s Republics anticipated this move for months, and it seems they prepared for it. When the Ukrainians cut off electricity to the DNR… as I’m sure before long it will be… I expect the power supply there to resume as effortlessly as it did in the LNR.

The fact that the Ukraine cut off electric power to the LNR and intends to do likewise to the DNR further severs whatever tenuous connection remained between the Ukraine and the two Republics. Now, in all respects, they’re de facto independent states, fully separated from the Ukraine. Now, the notion that they’re still part of the Ukraine is no more than a fiction. I understand that the people of the two Republics increasingly respond to surveys that they’re no longer Russian-speaking eastern Ukrainians. Instead, they increasingly redefine themselves as Russians. I expect this trend to accelerate and intensify, and I expect that in time that the two Republics would become fully part of Russia, although I don’t know how it’d happen or how long it’d take. Of course, for many practical purposes, they’re part of Russia already.

The Ukraine’s latest move also provides further confirmation of an unspoken truth. The Ukraine has given up hope of ever regaining control of the two People’s Republics. Moreover, it’s clear that it’d rather lose control of them than implement the constitutional provisions of the Minsk Agreement. That isn’t surprising. If the Ukraine ever implemented the Minsk Agreement’s constitutional provisions, it’d mean the end of the Maidan movement’s plan of a unitary monocultural Ukraine, distanced as far from Russia as possible. There’s no evidence any member of the Maidan leadership wants to abandon this plan, and if they did, the various far-right “activists” upon whom the Maidan régime depends for its survival wouldn’t let them.

That means that the Minsk Agreement… unloved by everyone… is dead. So long as the Maidan régime remains in power, they won’t carry it out. I’d add that if the Maidan régime ever falls… as I believe one day it will… it wouldn’t resurrect the Minsk Agreement because at that point no one would need it anymore. The Minsk Agreement is a ghost in whose existence everyone pretends to believe since it continues to provide a framework around which discussions about the Ukraine between the various parties can occur. However, it’s no longer a roadmap to a peace settlement, if it ever was. Undoubtedly, Russians understand this perfectly well. Whether Western governments do is another matter.

25 April 2017

Alexander Mercouris

The Duran

http://theduran.com/kiev-cuts-electricity-lpr-prepares-dpr/

Monday, 24 April 2017

Lavrov sez: “We Won’t Leave the People of the Donbass in the Lurch”

War damage in the Donbass… the fighting continues… but for how much longer?

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Minister of Foreign Affairs S V Lavrov said in an interview:

Our efforts will continue to aim at preventing “hotheads” in Kiev from starting a new cycle of violence in the southeast. In any case, we won’t leave the people of the Donbass in the lurch. The process of settlement in the southeast stalled because of the persistent reluctance of the Ukrainian leadership to fulfil its obligations under the Minsk Agreements. We’ll continue to work hard to make Kiev stop its blockade of the Donbass and proceed to a full implementation [of the Minsk Agreements]. We expect a similar attitude from the West, as they’ve repeatedly claimed that they want a speedy implementation of the Minsk Agreements, as they stated that there’s no alternative to them. The main point of the Minsk Agreements is that there should be direct dialogue between Kiev and Donetsk and Lugansk. Neither Russia nor the new US president nor anyone else will be able to do anything for the parties to the conflict, for a settlement depends upon direct negotiations between the parties on mutual guarantees of security and the principles of building a common future.

28 March 2017

RIA Novosti

https://ria.ru/world/20170328/1490939666.html

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