Voices from Russia

Saturday, 7 July 2018

Lady Godiva: A Righteous Englishwoman

Cloisters Cross (King of the Confessors), walrus ivory, carved by Master Hugo, mid-12th century

___________________________

According to a well-known tradition, Lady Godiva was a noblewoman who rode naked through the streets of Coventry, covering her modesty with her long hair. She did this to free the townspeople from the taxation that her husband imposed on them. Although postmodernists doubted this story, we see no reason to doubt the backbone of the tradition, which does date from at least the twelfth century. Of course, we should avoid modern misunderstandings… for example, Coventry was then a settlement of only a few hundred people and not a major city.

Godiva  (in Old English Godgifu) was a popular name, meaning “gift of God”. Lady Godiva was probably a widow when she married Leofric, Earl of Mercia. They had one known son, Aelfgar. Both were generous benefactors to monasteries. In 1043, Leofric founded and endowed a monastery in Coventry on the site of a convent destroyed by the Danes in 1016, Godiva being the moving force behind this act. In the 1050s, her name and her husband’s were on a grant of land to the monastery of St Mary in Worcester and on the endowment of the minster at Stow Mary in Lincolnshire.

 She and her husband are also commemorated as benefactors of other monasteries in Leominster, Chester, Much Wenlock and Evesham. Lady Godiva also gave Coventry a number of works in precious metal by the famous goldsmith Mannig and bequeathed a necklace valued at 100 Marks of silver. Another necklace went to Evesham for the figure of the Virgin accompanying the life-size gold and silver rood she and her husband gave, and St Paul’s Cathedral received a gold-fringed chasuble. She and her husband were among the most generous Old English donors in the last decades before the Norman Conquest.

Wulviva and Godiva (usually held to be Godiva and her sister) gave the manor of Woolhope in Herefordshire, along with four others, to the Cathedral in Hereford before the Norman Conquest. Her signature appears on a charter purportedly given by Thorold of Bucknall to the monastery of Spalding. It is possible that this Thorold, the Sheriff of Lincolnshire, was her brother. Leofric died in 1057, but Lady Godiva lived on, dying sometime between 1066 and 1086. The Domesday survey mentions her as the only Englishwoman to remain a major landholder shortly after the Norman Occupation. There seems little reason to doubt that her grave is with her husband’s in Coventry.

3 July 2018

Archpriest Fr Andrew Phillips

Orthodox England

http://www.events.orthodoxengland.org.uk/lady-godiva-a-righteous-englishwoman/

Sunday, 28 April 2013

28 April 2013. Sergei Yolkin’s World. A Mystery of the Sails of the Viking Dragon Ships… and of the Vikings Themselves

00 Sergei Yolkin. A Mystery of the Sails of the Viking Dragon Ships... and of the Vikings Themselves. 2013

A Mystery of the Sails of the Viking Dragon Ships… and of the Vikings Themselves

Sergei Yolkin

2013

______________________________

Sergei Yolkin pointed up that the sails of Viking ships could’ve looked differently than we previously thought… which is also true of the Vikings themselves.

23 April 2013

Sergei Yolkin

RIA-Novosti

http://ria.ru/caricature/20130423/934152869.html

Friday, 24 August 2012

24 August 2012. Sergei Yolkin’s World. In Search of the King of England

In Search of the King of England

Sergei Yolkin

2012

______________________________

A spokesman for the University of Leicester announced that British archaeologists have started large-scale excavations in Leicester, whose purpose is a search for the body of English monarch Richard III, the last king of the House of Plantagenet.

24 August 2012

Sergei Yolkin

RIA-Novosti

http://ria.ru/caricature/20120824/729734334.html

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.