Voices from Russia

Sunday, 19 March 2017

19 March 2017. Today is Submariners’ Day… On Guard for Peace

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Unlike their American analogues, Russian nuclear-powered general-purpose submarines have a defensive orientation, not an offensive one. That is, their job is to secure the two “Fortress Areas” in the Barents Sea and the Sea of Okhotsk. Rather than to attack seaborne lines-of-communication, their task is to protect the ballistic-missile-armed subs that are Russia’s “Doomsday Option”. Were the Americans to launch a strike on the land-based RVSN, the missile subs would launch a full-force attack on the USA (their missiles can reach the CONUS heartland of the USA from these oceanic bastions). As the Anglos are liars and bullies (especially, “conservatives”, but “liberals” aren’t far behind), this task is real and taken very seriously.

Truly, these men are “on guard for peace”… the history of the world since 1992 has proven what bloodthirsty knaves and criminals the Americans are. Thank God for the Russian submariners… they keep the feral Americans at bay. May God preserve them…

BMD

Friday, 12 August 2016

Sixteen Years Ago Today… In Remembrance of the K141 “Kursk” and Her Crew

00 Kursk russia submarine 120816

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СВЕТЛАЯ ПАМЯТЬ … BRIGHT MEMORY

On 12 August 2000, an accident in a training exercise in the Barents Sea led to the disaster of the sinking of the PLARK K 141 Kursk, a  Nuclear-powered Cruise Missile Submarine (SSGN/PLARK) of the Project 949A Antei class. The Kursk ended on the seafloor 108 metres below the surface. We remember; we mourn! This was one of the most tragic dates at the beginning of the third millennium. K141 Kursk was laid down in Severodvinsk in 1992, launched in May 1994, and joined the fleet on 30 December 1994. From 1995 to 2000, it was a unit of the Northern Fleet of the Russian Federation. In March 1995, Bishop Ioann, Rector of the Belgorodsky Seminary, blessed the submarine and its crewmen. Then, Vladyki Ioann gave the ship a copy of the 700-year-old icon of the Most Holy Birthgiver of Kursk; he also gave each submariner a small icon of St Nicholas the Wonderworker, to be a protector and intercessor. In 1999, during an operation off Yugoslavia, Kursk covertly surveilled the US Navy warship Theodore Roosevelt, whose planes were bombing Yugoslavia. During this time, Kursk completed five simulated attacks on the Roosevelt, all of which were successful. On 12 August 2000, Kursk took part in exercises, with 24 cruise missiles and a full load of torpedoes onboard. The Kursk tried to launch cruise missiles at a target, but an accident occurred… the sub sank to the ocean floor 108 metres under the surface of the Barents Sea, 175 kilometres from Severomorsk. Captain of the First Rank Lyachin and the entire crew died… in all, there were 118 victims. Later on, the Navy returned the remains of the majority of them to the surface and buried them together. On 26 August 2000, President Putin signed a decree honouring the memory of the crew. On 11 September 2000, one of the mountains in the central Caucasus mountain range received the name “Kursk”… to commemorate the crew of the submarine.

11 August 2016

Russia-Российская Федерация

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Sunday, 3 July 2016

Submarine “Stary Oskol” Deploys to Black Sea Base

00 russia submaine black sea 030716

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The Stary Oskol is the newest diesel submarine to join the Black Sea Fleet. It successfully completed its delivery voyage from its shipyard in St Petersburg to the Black Sea, arriving at its new permanent base in Novorossiysk. On its arrival, the ship’s company took part in a ceremony that included Admiral A V Vitko, the commander of the Black Sea Fleet. The Stary Oskol is the third unit of Project 636.3, built at the Admiralty Shipyard in St Petersburg specifically for the Black Sea Fleet. This class consists of third-generation diesel submarines, considered amongst the stealthiest of all submarines in worldwide service, being much quieter in operation than earlier Russian subs. This class is very combat-effective, with the latest missile and torpedo technology aboard, guided by the latest radar, electronic, and hydro-acoustic sensors.

2 July 2016

RF Minoborony

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Editor:

The US Navy, like all armed forces, tailors its forces to enable it to carry out its main missions (which means compromises on this-or-that). The main mission of the USN is to protect the seaborne LOCs of the Anglosphere, to keep it tied together as a single entity. Its secondary mission is to project and support American ground forces abroad, along with the USAF. This does NOT mean that American naval supremacy translates into “naval monopoly”. The USN bases its forces on carrier task groups and nuclear attack submarines (boomers are more national strategic assets, not naval forces per se). These systems are best utilised in blue-water deep-ocean scenarios, with much room for manoeuvre. They aren’t suited for narrow seas such as the Baltic, Mediterranean, and Black Seas. That is, no American carrier task force will operate in the Baltic or Black Seas due to the extreme danger posed by landbased anti-ship missiles and conventional subs like the Project 636s. Carrier task forces can only operate in the Med as they can count on landbased NATO assets to give them the additional air cover that they need in such confined seas.

That is, this deployment helps to cement Russian control of the northern Black Sea waters… a control that the USN would concede in wartime, much as the RN conceded control of the Baltic to the Kriegsmarine in both World Wars. To control it would simply cost too much in ships and men… a cost that the USN doesn’t consider well-worth paying. Don’t listen to American chest thumping… it can only do so much with the actual naval assets it possesses. The 636s are quieter than any American attack boat… in the narrow seas in which it operates, that makes the 636 the King of the Battlefield. Keep it focused…

BMD

Tuesday, 23 December 2014

Crimean Naval Base Command Formally Re-Established

V-Day in Sevastopol

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A spokesman for the ChF-MF (Black Sea Fleet) told journalists that the Crimean Naval Base Command (KVMB), an integral part of the Fleet until 1996, is now formally re-established and operational. He said, “The command is in Sevastopol, housed in the former Ukrainian Navy headquarters. Captain 1st Rank Yuri Zemsky, who previously commanded operational units in the Mediterranean, heads the new unit”. According to the KVMB chief of staff, Captain 1st Rank Aleksei Komarov, from 1 December, the 126 Separate Coastal Defence Brigade at Perevalnoe and a another separate coastal missile brigade in Sevastopol began operations, saying, “The new units went on duty, having combat elements to defend against enemy ship movements in the Black Sea”.

New Ships to Join ChF-MF

Today, Captain 1st Rank Oleg Krivorog, commander of the 30 Surface Warfare Division of the ChF-MF, revived on 1 December, told journalists that his unit will receive new ships of Frigate Project 11356, starting in mid-2015. He said, “In summer 2015, plans call for the first frigate of Project 11356, Admiral Grigorovich, to join the fleet. According to the plan, the frigate Admiral Essen would deploy in the Black Sea fleet by the end of next year. A year later, the frigate Admiral Makarov would join the 30 Division. Next, the Admiral Butakov and Admiral Istomin would follow them into service. The new ships of the 30 Division will have only contract service crews. The vessels are still under construction, but crew training for them is underway”.

21 December 2014

ITAR-TASS

http://itar-tass.com/armiya-i-opk/1662861 

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