Voices from Russia

Sunday, 10 June 2018

Pacific Fleet Ships Arrive in Philippines

BPK Admiral Vinogradov

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Fleet Spokesman Captain 2nd Rank Nikolai Voskresensky said:

A task force of the Pacific Fleet consisting of large anti-submarine ships Admiral Tributs and Admiral Vinogradov and mid-size sea tanker Pechenga arrived in Manila on an unofficial visit.

Under the visit programme, the task force commander, Captain 1st Rank Oleg Korolev, will hold a meeting with representatives of the Philippine Navy command staff and take part in a media briefing. Philippine servicemen will be able to visit the Russian vessels. The Russian visit will last until 14 June.

9 June 2018

TASS

http://tass.com/defense/1008857

Wednesday, 15 August 2012

15 August 2012. RIA-Novosti Infographics. Russian Naval Force Structure

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On 29 July, the Russian Navy noted the 316th anniversary of its establishment. The creation of a regular Russian Navy was part of the need for the country to overcome its territorial, political, and cultural isolation, which was the main impediment to economic and social development of the Russian state at the turn of the 18th century.

Mostly using indigenous resources, the Navy worked out the main shipbuilding problems and the effective handling of surface ships before the First World War. During the Second World War, naval aviation developed, and, in the post-war period, with the advent of missiles with nuclear warheads and marine nuclear power plants, submarines have become the capital units of the fleet. Eventually, the Navy became a multifaceted force of naval aviation, coastal defence, naval infantry, and an oceangoing fleet.

During the Great Patriotic War, the Navy secured the strategic flanks of the Soviet-German front, attacked the ships and vessels of the enemy, and defended Russian maritime communications. In the post-war years, the Navy took on oceanic tasks, integrating nuclear power and guided missiles, becoming a highly-mobile capable force able to undertake any task in the defence of the Russian State. Perhaps, the Navy hit its peak in combat potential in the mid-1980’s. Today, the Russian Navy consists of the Northern, Pacific, Baltic, and Black Sea Fleets, as well as the Caspian Flotilla.

1 August 2012

RIA-Novosti

http://en.rian.ru/infographics/20120801/174900219.html

Sunday, 5 February 2012

Russian Strategic Subs to Resume Routine World Patrols

RPKSN (SSBN) K-535 Yuri Dolgoruky (2009), surfaced, on trials

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Russian strategic nuclear submarines will resume routine extended patrols in international waters around the world in June 2012, Navy C-in-C Admiral Vladimir Vysotsky said. At a meeting with naval personnel on Friday, Vysotsky said, “On 1 June, or a bit later, we’ll resume constant patrolling of the world’s oceans by strategic nuclear submarines”. The annual number of extended patrols performed by Russian strategic nuclear submarines and nuclear-powered attack submarines dropped from more than 230 in 1984 to less than 10 today. Nevertheless, the Russian high command still believes that the submarine fleet’s the backbone of the Russian Navy, and that it’ll continue to play an important deterrent role in the future. The Russian Navy has 12 nuclear-powered strategic submarines in active service, comprising five Project 667BDR Kalmar (Delta-III) class, six Project 667BDRM Delfin (Delta-IV) class, and one Project 941 Akula (Typhoon) class. Two Project 941 Akula class submarines, the Arkhangelsk and the Severstal, remain in reserve at Severodvinsk in northern Russia. Russia decided to suspend the planned disposal of strategic nuclear submarines currently in service with the Navy and plans to build eight new Project 955 Borei class strategic submarines by 2020. The first Borei class submarine, the Yury Dolgoruky, may join the Pacific Fleet as early as in June this year.

4 February 2012

RIA-Novosti

http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20120204/171127327.html

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