Voices from Russia

Friday, 10 November 2017

Rostov-on-Don to Erect Monument to Famed Spy Richard Sorge, Not Solzhenitsyn

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Rostov-on-Don decided to erect a monument to famed Soviet spy Richard Sorge instead of one to Solzhenitsyn. The monument will be near School nr 80, named after Sorge. The decision to install the memorial took place at the last meeting [of the committee] on the names of socially-significant places. The recently-deceased Honoured Sculptor of Russia A A Apollonov created a bust of Sorge as a part of the project “Alley of Russian Glory”. The dedication of the memorial will be sometime in November.

Richard Sorge was a Soviet spy of the 20th-century, stationed in Japan, who had a cover as a German journalist. He received the award of Hero of the Soviet Union posthumously in 1964. One of the streets in Rostov-on-Don is Ulitsa Sorge.

8 November 2017

Lyubov Aleksandrovna Shlyapkina

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Friday, 7 November 2014

Russian Diplomats Laid Flowers on Grave of Soviet Spy Richard Sorge on the 70th Anniversary of His Death

00 Richard Sorge 01. 07.11.14

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00 Richard Sorge 02. 07.11.14

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At Tama Cemetery in the southwestern Tokyo suburbs, Russian diplomats held a memorial ceremony at the grave of legendary Soviet spy Richard Sorge on the 70th anniversary of his execution in Sugamo Prison on 7 November 1944. Flowers laid Russian Ambassador to Japan Yevgeny Afanasyev and senior diplomats of the Embassy, ​​as well as students of the school at the Russian diplomatic mission named after the famous spy, laid flowers on his grave. There were symposia and meetings on the Sorge Affair in Japan this month, as there’s still much interest in it amongst journalists and the scientific community. In particular, in particular, a major conference took place at the University of Aichi in Nagoya. On 8 November, at Tokyo’s Meiji University, with the support of the Centre for Studies of Japanese-Russian History, will host an International Symposium, which shall consider the activities of Sorge in China and Japan.

As an agent of Soviet military intelligence, German Communist Richard Sorge arrived in Japan in 1933 and created a highly effective network of agents. He enjoyed the full confidence of the Nazi Embassy in Tokyo, and he managed to receive secret information from the highest circles of the Japanese leadership. Under the code names “Ramsay” and “Inson”, he sent out one of the first pieces of intel on the approximate time of the planned attack of Nazi Germany on the USSR. Of even greater value was his intel about the fact that Japan wasn’t going to enter the war against the USSR in 1941. Historians say that he made a considerable contribution to Moscow’s victory. Japanese counterintel arrested Sorge on 18 October 1941. After interrogation, a court sentenced him to death by hanging. On 7 November 1944, in Sugamo Prison, the authorities hanged Sorge and his closest associate, Japanese journalist Ozaki Hotsumi. Another active agent in his group, Miyagi Yotoku, died in prison in 1943. Another member, journalist Branko Vukelić, received a life sentence, but died shortly afterwards, and US forces released radioman Max Clausen from prison after the war. In 1964, the USSR posthumously made Richard Sorge a Hero of the Soviet Union. Not only has there been a thorough investigation of Sorge’s life and times in Japan, just this year a very successful feature film about Sorge appeared in Japanese cinemas.

7 November 2014

ITAR-TASS

http://itar-tass.com/obschestvo/1556406

Editor:

Contemporary Russians do NOT denigrate the Soviet past… it’s one reason the godless Republican filth hate them so much. I’ll simply say this… the Church serves Pannikhida for the VOV war dead of the Red Army and it serves Pannikhida on the graves of the Soviet war dead in Spain. You can stand with the REAL Church or you can stand the phonies who suck up to the Republican Party. Choose wisely…

BMD

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