Voices from Russia

Tuesday, 30 May 2017

Zbigniew Kazimierz Brzeziński: Death of an Anti-Russian Terrorist

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Zbigniew Kazimierz Brzeziński is dead at the age of 89. The former US National Security Advisor put the feuds of his homeland above the interests of his adopted USA. Richard Nixon had more foreign policy achievements that just about any modern American President. However, Nixon’s scandal-plagued White House generally overshadowed these achievements. Amongst his most important achievements was engaging in détente with the USSR. Nixon’s de-escalation of tensions with Moscow ultimately led to the signing of the Helsinki Accords in 1975, wherein America and its allies and non-aligned states of Europe agreed to respect the borders and sovereignty of existing states, including that of the USSR and her allies. The Helsinki Accords affirmed renouncing violence as a means of settling disputes and forced signatories to respect the right of self-determination among peoples. This was a rare moment; the USA admitted that it couldn’t win the Cold War and that engagement and peaceful dialogue were preferable to threats against the Soviet superpower.

In 1976, Jimmy Carter became the President of the United States after Nixon’s former Vice-President Gerald Ford failed to win over an America hungry for change on the domestic front. While many remember Jimmy Carter as a man of peace, his Presidency was anything but peaceful. The reason for this was the power behind the throne, Carter’s National Security Advisor, Brzeziński. The Polish-born Brzeziński put the historic blood-feud of his mother country ahead of American interests. He openly opposed Nixon and Ford’s policy of détente and orchestrated the use of American power to arm and fund all those who sought to undermine the USSR.

This became most apparent when he decided to use the USA’s resources to fund, arm, and train the Mujahideen in Afghanistan. Among the fighters Brzeziński’s policy helped to arm was Osama bin Laden, the founder of the Salafist terrorist group al-Qaeda. The USA later blamed that group for orchestrating and executing the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the USA. Brzeziński was happy to ally with blood-soaked jihadists to topple the secular modern government of Afghanistan, for the simple reason that it was a Soviet ally. Brzeziński’s jihadists took over the country in the 1990s; they famously executed and then mutilated the corpse of Afghanistan’s pro-Soviet President Dr Mohammad Najibullah in 1996. Many blame the Brzeziński-authored policies in Afghanistan for unleashing the plague of jihadist terrorism throughout the wider world.

Brzeziński’s formal time in the White House was only for Jimmy Carter’s single term, but many of his policies lived on long after his formal period in power. Throughout the rest of his life, Brzeziński continued to vocally advocate policies designed to cripple Russia, including NATO’s expansion into Eastern Europe. He was a strong supporter of the 2014 coup against the legitimate Ukrainian government and more recently said that the Russian Federation would break up. Furthermore, he said that the USA must help those wanting to break it up, irrespective of who they are. He continued to advocate sanctions against Russia until his dying day, in spite of the fact that the sanctions ended up hurting his native Poland more than the Russian Federation he sought to destroy.

Brzeziński was a deeply violent and hateful man. He was also dishonest; he told the last Shah of Iran that the USA would give him full backing, knowing well that there was division in the White House on the issue. He was a man who brought ancient hatreds, hatreds which long pre-dated the USA’s existence, into the heart of American policy making. At the age of 89, Brzeziński is dead. Even if he lived another hundred years, he’d never see his dream, the death of Russia. Russia remains alive and well, and in this sense, perhaps, he died knowing that his entire reason for being was a failure.

26 May 2017

Adam Garrie

The Duran

http://theduran.com/zbigniew-brzezinski-death-anti-russian-terrorists/

Saturday, 20 May 2017

20 May 2017. Here are MY Heroes… Вечная слава! Во веки слава!

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Today, a great man turned 100-years-old! Let’s all celebrate his birthday and spread the news far and wide! Mikhail Vasilyevich Podgursky was in the Naval Infantry, serving in the Winter War against Finland, the VOV, and the war against the Japanese fascists. He was born in Moscow in 1917, serving in the forces from 1938 to 1946. Mikhail Vasilyevich was at the front serving with the 7, 14, 32, and 38 Armies, leaving service as a war invalid due to serious wounds. He served with the Naval Infantry in the Northern and Pacific Fleets. He received numerous orders and medals for his service in the VOV. He was a double laureate at exhibitions at the VDNKh. Ship models created by M V Podgursky are in the Central Museum of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-45 on Poklonnaya Gora and in schools and museums in Moscow, St Petersburg, Stalingrad (Volgograd), Sevastopol, Murmansk, Tula, and other cities. For his active and long work in military-patriotic education, Mikhail Vasilyevich received numerous honorary medals and citations from the Moscow and the Russian Committees for War Veterans, the Minoborony Rossii, the Russian Navy, ROSTO, the Ministry of Culture, and other organisations. On 17 May 2017, Mikhail Vasilyevich will celebrate his 100th birthday! Our best wishes to you and we hope for your continued good health, Mikhail Vasilyevich! To the Great Victory! We bow before you, for the Great Victory you won!

17 May 2017

Sergei Suslov

Facebook

Sunday, 14 May 2017

Putin on Victory Day: “There is No Force, and There’ll Be No Force, That Could Conquer Our People”

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There is no force, and there’ll be no force, that could conquer our people. We couldn’t prevent this horrible tragedy, firstly, due to connivance at the criminal ideology of racial supremacy, due to the disunity amongst the world’s leading countries, which allowed the Nazis to appropriate the right to decide the destiny of other peoples, to unleash the cruelest and bloodiest war, and to enslave and make almost all European countries serve their deadly goals. We feel a deep and strong kinship with this generation of heroes and victors. Moreover, I’ll tell them the following… you’ll never feel ashamed of us! The Russian soldier today, like in all the times, shows courage and heroism, and is ready for any podvig*, for any sacrifice, for the sake of his Motherland and his people.

  • Podvig: Should NEVER be “Englished”… one of the most powerful words in the Russian language. There are literally no English equivalents strong enough. Podvig has overtones of “epic”, “heroic”, “bravery”, “self-sacrifice”, “victory”, “effort”, and “triumph”. It’s best to leave it as is, and admit that English lacks the necessary material to give meaning to this word.

The lessons of the past war urge us to be vigilant and the Russian Armed Forces are capable of repelling any potential aggression, but today life itself requires increasing our defence potential. However, we need the entire international community to come together to fight terrorism, extremism, neo-Nazism, and other threats effectively. We’re open for such coöperation. Russia will always be on the side of those in the world who choose the road of fair partnership, who reject war as being alien to the very essence of life and human nature. The further the events of the Great Patriotic War recede into history, the higher our responsibility before future generations. We must pass stability and peace on the planet to them; pass on the harsh and heroic truth about the Patriotic War and the Great Victory’s spirit and essence, so that our descendants love Russia fervently as well. People should keep in their memory the generation that selflessly fought for the Motherland and defended its freedom and independence with honour.

9 May 2017

TASS

http://tass.com/world/945093

Saturday, 13 May 2017

VOV Veteran Archpriest Yevgeny Fedorov: “Lord, If I Survive, I’ll Serve Thee!”

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Archpriest Yevgeny Fedorov, a 93-yer-old VOV vet who ended the war in Berlin, lives near the shore of Lake Peretno in Novgorod Oblast (Okulovka Raion). In the face of death, he made a vow to the Lord, which he carried out after the war.

The VOV began a few days after Yevgeny graduated from Class 9 in Porkhov (Pskov Oblast). The Germans occupied the city at the beginning of the war and started to expel the local population. The fascists took over the Fedorov’s house, so the family had to move in with relatives. To build barracks for the occupiers, the Germans pressganged young people to do the work. Yevgeny and others had to do slave labour. However, he and a friend escaped the labour gang and hid from the fascist occupiers in the countryside near the city. Hiding in the winter was difficult, as they left traces in the snow whenever they moved. If the fascists caught them, they’d shoot them immediately. The only option open to them was to find out where the partisans were and join them. Therefore, they joined a patriot partisan band that winter.

One day, his partisan section went on a mission where only the commander knew the objective. This was so that if the fascists captured any of the group, they wouldn’t spill the beans. They travelled at night, as the Germans watched all the roads. The fascists had built strongpoints at crucial locations. The section crossed the first highway successfully. However, when they tried to cross the railroad tracks, they came under machinegun and mortar fire. The group was lucky… the terrain was marshy, so the mortar shells exploded harmlessly in the swampy ground. Yevgeny’s section tried to hide in the underbrush, but the wintertime lack of foliage couldn’t completely hide the men. A German armoured train pulled up and started shooting into the forest. Soldiers with avtomats came out, shooting at the partisans. One could hear the cries of the wounded; many partisans died on this mission.

Yevgeny had to crawl on the ground. He got up to see what was going on… he seemed to freeze; his body seemed to stick fast to the earth. He realised that he needed to flee, but his feet didn’t seem to want to move. Yevgeny was down on all fours, with his feet and hands sinking into the thick snow. He was lucky… the unit medic was nearby. She ran up and took off his valenki. Blood flowed from his right leg, so she tore his trousers and made a bandage. His comrades put him on a sledge, but he was thirsty. Someone made some water from melted snow, he took a sip, but they took it away quickly. Yevgeny thought, “If I drink too much snowmelt, I might catch a cold”. The partisans looked out for one another.

The section entered a village and put the four wounded on the floor in a hut. Everybody was very hungry, so the housewife gave them some bread, but their teeth were sore from lack of vitamins. Then, they asked for something sour, so she brought them sieved blueberries. After eating the berries, their teeth felt better, so they were able to eat the bread. The wounded needed attention… there was a surgeon in the village, but he didn’t have any anaesthetics, so he refused to operate. Yevgeny’s wound remained untreated… he had a crushed tibia and the bullet was still inside. He lay like that for over three weeks. His wound became infected; it swelled and turned blue. Everyone who saw his foot said that Yevgeny was going to lose his leg.

Finally, Yevgeny got to the hospital, but it wasn’t easy. Firstly, the wounded had to go across the fascist-occupied territory and cross the frontline. They had to move at night, to avoid detection. They finally reached the rendezvous point. When the train arrived, the group had to leave cover. At that moment, the fascists launched a flare, revealing that they had brought up a tank. The section had to pull back to the village. Some of the group refused to go again on the second night, but they did depart again for the second time, and they managed to cross the frontline successfully.

The hospital was in tents, with five surgeons on duty. They placed Yevgeny on the operating table and a metre away, another surgeon was amputating the leg of another soldier. The surgeon had to cut the leg open as he had no x-rays and had to operate blindly. Yevgeny could only say, “I’m in pain”, and pointed to his tibia. When he came out from anaesthesia, he didn’t know where he was and he couldn’t move. He opened his eyes… “Did they amputate my leg or not?” He tried to lift up to look at his feet, but the nurse kept him down. Later on, Yevgeny found out that one couldn’t lift up your head after anaesthesia, as it can cause nausea. Therefore, he stopped struggling, so the nurse raised up his head… he saw two feet! Yevgeny calmed down… “The Lord saved my leg!”

After his recovery, Yevgeny served in the signals arm. Early in 1945, during the liberation of Warsaw, his unit’s radio operators weren’t on the net. Yevgeny went with his comrade Trofim Mustikov to see what happened. It was important, for their radio was the only link with higher HQ and the rest of the army. They reached the supposed place of the signals point, but no one was there. There was only the two of them, armed only with rifles. If the fascists saw them, it’d be curtains. Peace seemed elusive; it was as if an endless war engulfed the entire world. Yevgeny thought, “If I don’t die today, I’ll die tomorrow, for the enemy fights very hard”. He said out loud, “What’ll life be like after the war? Please, spare my life so that I can see it!” He asked himself, “How can I thank God for what I’ve asked? Lord, if I survive, I’ll serve Thee!”

When the war was over, Yevgeny and his family went back to Porkhov. His father took out a loan and built a house. The family attended services at St John the Baptist church. One day, Elder Fyodor visited Fr Nikolai, the parish rector. Fr Nikolai told Yevgeny, “Invite the elder to your house for a visit”. Yevgeny agreed. Whilst sitting in the garden, Elder Fyodor asked Yevgeny, “Would you like to become a priest?” Yevgeny hadn’t even thought of that, he didn’t know what to say, so he said nothing. All of a sudden, as they continued to chat, the elder suddenly said, “Do you want to do it or don’t you want to do it? God is calling you! Go!” He seemed to be seeing the future.

Nevertheless, it took many years for Yevgeny to become a priest. He did attend services more often and enjoyed being there more. Yevgeny enjoyed conversations with the clergy. He worked as an inventory clerk and then as a manager. Finally, in the summer of 1958, he decided to seek seminary education. Yevgeny passed the exams to the seminary at the Trinity-St Sergei Lavra, but he couldn’t attend, as they didn’t approve his documents for training, so he went back to his old job. When his superiors found out what he’d done, they fired him. Fr Nikolai told him, “You’re out of work? Come with me!” They went to Borovichi to meet with Archbishop Sergei Golubtsov of Novgorod and Staraya Russa. In 1959, the bishop decided to ordain Yevgeny to the diaconate in the cathedral in Novgorod. A week later, in Borovichi, the bishop ordained Yevgeny to the priesthood. Bishop Sergei had to do it quickly, for the authorities could prevent an ordination. After that, Yevgeny served a parish in Markovo in Moshenskoe Raion (Novgorod Oblast). For a while, Yevgeny had to move about, as the authorities closed some of the parishes that he served. Nonetheless, his last parish, in Peretno in Okulovka Raion, was his favourite… he served there for over forty years.

Fr Yevgeny earned 23 different decorations and orders. He holds the Order of Grand Prince St Vladimir Equal-to-the-Apostles (III and II Class). His diocese wanted him to receive the Order of Grand Prince St Aleksandr Nevsky, but a patriarchal ukase stipulated that he receive the St Vladimir Order (II class) instead. He also holds the Medal of Righteous St Yaakov of Borovichi, Wonderworker of Novgorod and is an Honoured Citizen of Okulovka Raion. He holds the military awards of the Order of the Patriotic War (II Class), Zhukov Medal, Medal “For Courage”, Medal “For the Liberation of Warsaw”, Medal “For the Capture of Berlin”, Medal “For Victory Over Germany in the Great Patriotic War of 1941-45”, and other military decorations.

10 May 2017

Ivan Rusov

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