Voices from Russia

Saturday, 28 April 2012

28 April 2012. RIA-Novosti Presents… Night Wolves MC and Muscovite Drivers Rally in Support of Patriarch Kirill

On Saturday, bikers from the Night Wolves MC rode en masse to Moscow with balloons that read, “Christ is Risen”.

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Through this action, the Night Wolves supported the coming molieben of Patriarch Kirill Gundyaev of Moscow and all the Russias.

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A S Zaldostanov (better known as “The Surgeon”… he’s a qualified surgeon in real life) told RIA-Novosti, “I’m against demoniacs (бесноватых) who ridicule believers. So, we decided to combine the opening of the biking season with a run in support of Patriarch Kirill and the Church; this action is my contribution. We’ll ride with balloons attached to our bikes with the letters ‘XB’ (first letters of ‘Christ is Risen’ in the Cyrillic alphabet); tonight, we’ll release them into the sky”.

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Orthodox believers participated in an auto rally on the Garden Ring Road in support of the Patriarch, to counter what they see as a media campaign against him.

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Several hundred people took part in the auto rally.

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The organisers of the auto rally in support of Patriarch Kirill invited everyone to join in, even those who didn’t have a car. Kirill Frolov told RIA-Novosti, “We put everybody in a car; there was enough room for everybody”.

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The rally was coordinated as a picket. The protesters formed up on the Prospekt Sakharova. After a brief prayer service, and presentations by members of the organising committee, the protesters circled the Garden Ring Road, “without creating a nuisance and not impeding traffic”.

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The motorcycle rally, which started around 20.00 MSK at the Sparrow Hills lookout, attracted about a thousand bikers. Aleksandr the Surgeon said, “In past years, we had 10,000 motorcycles at the opening of season rally. This year’s spring was sudden, so, not everybody had time to prepare their bike”.

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The Night Wolves drove through the city on a route that they had cleared earlier with the GIBDD.

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Participants in the rally passed through the streets of Downtown Moscow.

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Pro-Church auto rally participants on the Garden Ring Road in Moscow.

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Interestingly enough, this image was from the “Russian side” of RIA-Novosti, not the “English side”… this means that the rally organisers saw that they needed to reach out to foreigners, especially to other Orthodox Christians. Orthodox here in the American diaspora should reflect on the fact that neither oca.org nor the ROCOR official website carried this image… even though it was meant for us, no doubt. They’ll publicise and post lying extremist rightwing rubbish attacking President Obama (claiming that he wants to curtail religious freedom… what utter and spurious rot), but they won’t publicise this. What a buncha losers and maroons…

BMD  

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21 April 2012

RIA-Novosti

http://ria.ru/photolents/20120421/631757431.html

Friday, 13 January 2012

VOR Presents… Old New Year’s Eve: The Second Time Around

On the night before 14 January, Russians celebrate one of their most paradoxical and favourite holidays… the Old New Year. The tradition to celebrate Old New Year comes from the differences between the Julian (also called “Old Style”) and Gregorian calendars, the latter of which is now virtually the universal standard throughout the entire globe. The discrepancy between the calendars in the 20th and 21st centuries is 13 days {and will go to 14 days in  the 22nd century, due to differences in calculating leap years: editor}.

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Old New Year is a rare historical phenomenon, an additional holiday, which came about because of a change of era. Because of this calendar discrepancy, we now note two “New Years”… Old and New Style.

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Ever since 1918, when Russia switched over to the “New Style” calendar, it’s been a tradition to celebrate the Old New Year.

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On the Vorobyovy Gory (Sparrow Hills) in Moscow, revelers display paper flying lanterns in honour of the the Old New Year.

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In the Russia, the tradition to celebrate the Old New Year came about because the Orthodox Church in Russia still marks all religious holidays according to the Julian calendar (Old Style). The modern New Year falls during the Christmas Lent… it’s an Orthodox day of abstinence to prepare for the coming Christmas holiday {which falls on 7 January on the secular calendar: editor}.

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Thus, on the night of 13 to 14 January, everyone who can afford to “re-celebrate” marks this most favourite holiday. For many believers, Old New Year’s of particular importance because they can only celebrate it with full vigour and soulfully after the end of Christmas Lent.

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After the collapse of the Soviet Union, besides Russia, people also celebrated the Old New Year in Moldova, Armenia, Byelorussia, Latvia, the Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan (about 40% of the population), and Georgia, as well as by Slavs and residents of other former Soviet republics and Orthodox countries in the Near and Far Abroad. In the image above, revellers in Carpatho-Russia celebrate the Old New Year, or as they say in po-nashemu, Malanku.

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Young men and soldiers from the Siberian District of the MVD Internal Troops hold a mock fist fight to celebrate the Old New Year in Trinity Square.

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In Russia before 1918, the arrival of the New Year came during the Holy Days (Svyatki) between Christmas and Epiphany, so all the traditional people’s new-year omens, divination, carnivals and carol-sing are more applicable to the Old New Year than to the celebration of the modern New Year.

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Villagers from Zakalnoe sing kolyadki during the celebration of the Old New Year.

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It’s interesting that the difference between Julian and Gregorian calendars grows every century, when the first two digits of the number of the beginning of the century isn’t evenly divisible by four, the difference grows by one day.

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In Carpatho-Russia, on 13 January, they celebrate the Old New Year or Malanku. Here, we see revellers wearing costumes.

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Today, year in and year out, Old New Year’s is growing in popularity, and Russia is no exception. More people refer to it as independent holiday, which extends the cheer of New Year, or it’s when you truly feel it’s the charm for the first time. In fact, this holiday’s more relaxing, for people don’t feel the pressure that inevitably accompanies the modern New Year.

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Here’s a hint… the most traditional dishes for the Old New Year’s table are pork products. An Old New Year’s meal isn’t skimpy… on Vasiliev Vecher (St Basil’s Eve), everything was the best and tastiest that one could get, people normally had meat pies, kolbasy (sausages), meat, bliny (pancakes), kutya, and kasha, and people washed it all down with beer, wine, and vodka. The Old New Year’s table HAS to have kutya and any kind of pork, as St Basil is the patron saint of pigs. Also usual were dishes containing rabbit and chicken. According to popular belief, eating rabbit made one nimble as a hare, to eat chicken made one as light as a bird. If one was well-off, a boar’s or pig’s head as the centrepiece of the spread table was obligatory.

http://ria.ru/infografika/20120113/538360115.html (if you click on the link, it has some recipes in Russian)

http://ria.ru/ny2012_food_recipes/20120105/517173924.html (here’s some Christmas recipes in Russian)

13 January 2012

Voice of Russia World Service

http://rus.ruvr.ru/photoalbum/39603318/63809324/index.html

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