Voices from Russia

Saturday, 20 May 2017

The Ukraine’s War on Orthodox Christianity

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The Ukrainian Verkhovnaya Rada is considering legislation that could lead to a ban on the Ukrainian Orthodox Church/Moscow Patriarchate (UPTs/MP). If the new laws pass, they’d allow the Ukrainian régime to ban churches, regulate worship, monitor church activities, ban missionaries from entering the country, and seize the assets of churches. The laws would only apply to churches whose ecclesiastical leadership was in what Ukrainian nationalists consider “aggressor states”. Russia is the only state that the Ukraine currently views as an aggressor. Not only is this an attack on the freedom of worship, it’s clearly a racially motivated attack on believers. Advocates of religious freedom all over the world condemned these proposals. The Ukrainian proposals would be totally illegal in the EU (which Ukraine seeks to join) as well as the USA. Previously, Metropolitan Ilarion Alfeyev drew the world’s attention to the oppression of Middle Eastern Christians at the hands of western-backed jihadist groups. He called the Ukrainian proposals:

It’s a full-scale war on believers. In the first place, these draft laws target the UPTs/MP. That’s no question; it’s obvious. These bills don’t even try to cover it up. The UPTs/MP would be under the submission of the Kiev authorities in a way that didn’t exist even in Soviet times.

Fr Andrei Zuevsky told RT:

Should state officials be given the right to forcefully eliminate religious communities, that’d be open and brutal interference into believers’ private lives. In Orthodox Christianity, personal faith is largely realised within a community, a church. When a government interferes in its life, it violates religious freedom.

An MP statement said:

The proposals threaten the constitutional rights of millions of Ukrainian believers; they may cause a wave of violence, new seizures of churches, and escalate the intercommunal conflict in the Ukraine.

Over 300,000 people signed a petition protesting attempts to destroy religious freedom in the Ukraine.

18 May 2017

Adam Garrie

The Duran

http://theduran.com/ukraines-war-on-orthodox-christianity/

Monday, 8 May 2017

Two Roadside Bombs Explode in DNR Before Zakharchenko’s Motorcade Arrival

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On Monday, our correspondent reported that two roadside bombs exploded near the Saur Mogila memorial complex in the DNR shortly before the arrival of a motorcade with DNR Head of state A V Zakharchenko. The explosions occurred on the only road to the memorial a few minutes before cars with journalists were supposed to use it. Zakharchenko was to follow this same route. The site was going to host events dedicated to the 72nd anniversary of the end of the VOV. No one was hurt and police sealed off that section of road.

8 May 2017

Sputnik International

https://sputniknews.com/europe/201705081053373377-dpr-bombing-zakharchenko-motorcade/

Friday, 5 May 2017

A Lousy Shot: Ukrainian Army Complains About Shoddy US-Made Cartridges

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RIA Novosti quoted Sergei Zgurets, chief editor of the Ukrainian magazine Defence Express, as saying that Ukrainian soldiers are unhappy with the quality of sniper cartridges purchased from the US firm SBR.  The Ukraine uses the ammunition in the current Donbass conflict.  Zgurets, for his part, cited a military source:

The  US cartridges’ quality leaves much to be desired.  These bullets “devour” our sniper rifles’ barrels.  This ammunition is worse in terms of accuracy than what we buy on our own.  The cores of the armour-piercing bullets just crumble when they touch an armoured barrier.

Zgurets pointed up:

Earlier this year, the Ukraine purchased four varieties of US-made cartridges for different ammo calibres for several types of sniper rifles.  However, it turned out that the ammunition isn’t sufficiently accurate, and only a few of the US bullets were capable of piercing a 6-millimetre steel plate in bulletproof jackets.  Armour-piercing 12.7mm and 8.58-mm cartridges have characteristics worse than the Soviet B-32 cartridge of a smaller calibre.

He quoted military sources:

The copper level in the purchased ammunition is less than what’s required; it is something that makes the bullet more “resilient”, so the wear and tear on the sniper weapons’ barrels allows them to fire only about a thousand shots.  To make things worse, the US cartridges proved to be non-waterproof, and if a liquid leaked into such a cartridge, its powder can become damp.  As far as sniper ammunition is concerned, the Americans got the money, which should prompt Kiev to demand that the cartridges’ quality is on a par with the price tag.

In late March, Ukrainian Defence Minister S T Poltorak said that the Ukrainian forces are now in need of some types of ammunition.  He said:

The Ukraine is planning to buy ammunition from our partners while we build munitions factories in our country.

Also in March, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said that US President Donald Trump wouldn’t provide any information related to sending lethal defensive weapons to the Ukraine because he doesn’t want to undermine his own negotiating strategy.  At present, US military assistance to Kiev is limited to supplying uniforms and equipment, including counter-battery radars, drones, and means of secure communication.

4 May 2017

Sputnik International

https://sputniknews.com/europe/201705041053266767-ukraine-united-states-ammunition-quality/

Editor:

The interesting thing about Poltorak is that he’s not a real soldier… he was a cop who specialised in protecting politicians.  No wonder the Ukrainian forces can’t shoot straight… they’re led by a man who never served in a real army and who spent much of his life as a glorified bodyguard.  Such is life, though…

BMD

Thursday, 4 May 2017

Five Reasons Why the Ukraine Is a Bigger Threat to Peace and Safety than the DPRK Is

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It doesn’t fit the western narrative, but the Ukraine is a far bigger threat to its own people and its neighbours than the DPRK is or has been for decades.  Often, people think of the Korean Peninsula as a volatile region, a dangerous region, an unpredictable “weaponised” region.  In particular, the USA accused the DPRK of being a threat to regional peace and stability.  Objectively, there is some truth to all of this, but the Demilitarised Zone (DMZ) separating the two Korean states is far less unstable than the Syria/Iraq border currently controlled by ISIS.  However, when it comes to threatening regional instability and causing bloodshed, one place is vastly more deadly and volatile than the Korean Peninsula… the battlezone between the fascist Ukraine and the Donbass Peoples Republics.  Despite the fact that the ROK and the DPRK are technically still at war, the region has been remarkably stable and calm since the ceasefire that ended the hot conflict on the peninsula in 1953.  Despite occasional worrying movements on the DMZ separating the two Koreas since 1953, life in the ROK and the DPRK has developed in such a way that all Koreans live their daily lives in a normal way according to the standards that each unique Korean state set for its citizens over the decades since the hot period of the Korean War.  For all of its rhetorical bluster, the DPRK remains technically committed to a “no first strike” policy in respect of nuclear weapons.  Because of this, letting a sleeping dog lie would be good advice for the more hawkish forces in Washington.  Compare that to the Ukraine/Donbass conflict.

1. Duration and Nature of the Conflicts

The Ukraine, a united country between 1991 and 2014 but with deep political divisions, has split.  The DNR and LNR arose after the fascist coup in Kiev.  Since then, regular forces, mercenaries, and terrorists loyal to Kiev invaded and attacked the DNR and LNR, almost without cessation.  This is in total violation of the Minsk II ceasefire agreement, which unlike the successful Korean War ceasefire, was dead on arrival.  The Ukrainian war of aggression against the Donbass Republics started in February 2014 and still rages.  It’s already gone on for longer than the 37 months of the Korean War.  That war lasted between June 1950 and July 1953 before the ceasefire took effect.  Besides this, there were attempted terrorist attacks on neighbouring Russia, attacks thankfully thwarted by Russian security services.  By contrast, the last time the DPRK violated the ceasefire with the ROK was in 1975 when DPRK soldiers committed an “axe murder” of two American soldiers chopping down a tree in the DMZ.  When all was said and done, the USA reacted by chopping down the rest of the tree as a “show of force”.

2. Chemical Weapons 

Whilst no heavy weapons have fired from one Korean state to another since 1953, the Ukraine is guilty of using illegal chemical weapons on civilian targets in the Donbass.  The SK RF concluded that white phosphorus was Kiev’s chemical weapon of choice when attacking the Donbass.

3. Deaths

While death hasn’t been a daily feature of Korean life since 1953, you can’t say the same for the Donbass.  As of December 2016, the UN reported that nearly 10,000 people, including women and children, died in the Donbass conflict, and many suggest the UN figure is low, compared to the even grimmer realities on the ground.  Many more people, including civilians, died since then.  Beyond the deaths, torture and rape, including child rape is a feature of Kiev’s war of aggression.  No such analogue exists in the Korean states.

4. Political Maturity 

Although both Koreas have a goal of uniting the peninsula under their respective flags, so, in turn, don’t acknowledge the political legitimacy of the other state, in reality, both accept the fact that for the foreseeable future they’ll have to live side by side.  Not even the most radical anti-communists in the ROK plan to storm the border in a “war of liberation”, nor will the DPRK turn Seoul into a “sea of flames” unless provoked.  It’s all bombastic rhetoric and has been since the 1950s.  Just as the Federal Republic of Germany and the DDR lived side-by-side without engaging in war, a similar “cold peace” exists between the ROK and the DPRK.

By contrast, the Ukraine is totally confused about its own position on the Donbass Republics.  On the one hand, they claim that the territory is part of a unitary Ukrainian state, but on the other, they cut off water, electricity and other vital supplies to the Republics.  The Ukraine legally removed the rights of Russian speakers throughout the country and purged Russian from Ukrainian media.  The Kiev régime refuses to allow trains from the Donbass into Kiev-controlled regions and they don’t issue passports and birth certificates in the Donbass, which led Russia to accept legal ID issued in the Donbass Republics as legitimate documents.  The Ukraine calls the Donbass people terrorists, “Russian agents”, and everything else to make them as distant as possible.  By contrast, neither Pyongyang nor Seoul challenges the “Korean-ness” of those on the other side of the DMZ.  Just yesterday, President Putin said that Moscow didn’t lure the Donbass Republics into its realm, but rather Kiev simply cut them off, isolated them, alienated them, and pushed them away.  One could add historical inevitability to this list. 

5. The Nuclear Question 

While there are no longer nuclear weapons in the Ukraine, there are many nuclear power facilities and most are in a state of total disrepair.  The Ukrainian nuclear sector is amongst the least safe in the world. The combination of lack of funds and a disorganised central government allowed a situation to develop that could result in another Chernobyl-style disaster.  The Energy Post described the Ukrainian nuclear sector as having “persistent safety problems”.  In an article from 2016, the Energy Post described how the Ukraine’s neighbours live in fear of another nuclear meltdown in the Ukraine:

“The Ukraine’s neighbours are also concerned.  Romania, Slovakia, Hungary, and Austria sent multiple questions for clarification and requests for participation in transboundary consultations.  However, Kiev, in response, denied its obligation to conduct any.  One might think that this experience, or perhaps civil society’s repeated warnings, would make decision makers reconsider this reckless adventure, but not the Ukrainian government”.

While “nuclear war” is a better headline than “nuclear safety concerns”, the fact is that since 1945, the world’s biggest nuclear disasters were the result of poorly managed nuclear power facilities and not nuclear weapons.  In this sense, the Ukraine’s “nuclear problem” is a more dire danger to global safety than the DPRK’s nuclear weapons programme, which thus far has never fired a missile in anger.

Between 2014 and the present day, the Ukraine killed more innocent civilians than either Korean state has even attempted to do since 1953.  The Ukraine breaks ceasefire agreements on a daily basis while the Korean states haven’t.  The Ukraine used chemical weapons on civilians whilst neither Korean state has done so, nor unlike the quiet Korean political conflict, Kiev’s war of aggression is going on at this very moment.  Furthermore, the Ukraine’s silent nuclear problem is manifestly more worrying than the DPRK’s weapons programme.  Objectively, no one could argue that either Korean state is as dangerous or as volatile as post-coup Ukraine.

3 May 2017

Adam Garrie

The Duran

http://theduran.com/5-reasons-why-ukraine-is-a-bigger-threat-to-peace-and-safety-than-north-korea/

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