Voices from Russia

Monday, 10 February 2014

A Multimedia Presentation. Being Black in Moscow… And More… It’s Black History Month

pushkin

It’s Black History Month… here’s a gallery of REAL Black Russians… don’t forget, Pushkin had African blood in his veins (racist American Southerners would’ve considered him “black” for that reason, according to their “one drop” rule)! All Russians know that (and we DON’T hold such against him, no siree… the Church and the Party both FIGHT racism and bigotry, unlike American Radical Sectarianism and the Republican Party). Pushkin was the greatest poet in the Russian language and the Father of Literary Russian… that’s all that one can say…

Black Russians enriched and enrich our people… they’re blood of our blood, bone of our bone, soul of our soul… as it was, as it is, may it always be so…

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01 Vasili Ivanovich Krima

Vasili Ivanovich Krima (1972- ), a native of Guinea-Bissau, settled in Russia after earning a degree from Volgograd State Pedagogical University. He and his wife, Anait, who is of Armenian descent, have a son. He ran for local office in Volgograd Oblast

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01b Black Russians Yelena Khanga

Yelena Abdulyaevna Khanga (1962- ), television presenter and journalist

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01c Black Russians Jean Gregoire Sagbo

Jean Gregoire Sagbo (1962- ) (left), Bénin-born Russian local official in Novozavidovsk (Tver Oblast)

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One of the most classic films of Soviet cinema,  Цирк (Tsirk: Circus) was about an American circus performer who went to the USSR because Americans treated her badly because she had bore a mixed-race child out-of-wedlock. The above scene is the most famous. Clearly, this is one of the masterpieces of world cinema; it remains popular and well-known in Russia to this day. If you’d like to see the whole movie, click here

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00 Ermengeld Konovalov. 10.02.14

Ermengeld Nikolaevich Konovalov (1937-94), Soviet cinema and theatre actor, mime, playwright, and director 

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01d Black Russians Lyukman Rasakovich Adams

Lyukman Rasakovich Adams (1988- ), European Champion triple jumper, Russian Army officer, Master of Sport International Class

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President Vladimir Putin gives a short (but real) speech outlining our Russian Spirit (with English subtitles)… it’s why Black Russians are OF our people… not with our people. All races, all religions, that’s Russia for us! It’s why Russia will prevail over the greedster Americans…

Multiculturalism is a GOOD thing… mistrust all who hate it…

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01e Black Russians Viktoria Pierre-Marie

Viktoriya Pierre-Marie (1979- ), jazz singer and professor of the fine arts

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00 Grigori Siyatvinda. 10.02.14

Grigori Devidovich Siyatvinda (1970- ), cinema and theatre actor, Honoured Artist of Russia, winner of the State Prize of the Russian Federation

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Here’s the full version of How Wide is My Motherland (Широка страна моя родная: Shiroka strana moya rodina) (with English subtitles)… Russia’s for ALL of us… or it’s for none of us. No one is forgotten… Nothing is forgotten…

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01f Black Russians Nkeirouka Ezekh

Nkeiruka (Kira) Khilarievna Ezekh (1983- ), International Master of Sport in curling and Software Engineer 

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01g Black Russians Emilia Turey

Emilia Khalsberievna Turey (1984- ), silver medallist at the 2008 Beijing Olympics in handball, Honoured Master of Sport…

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00e James Patterson. Moscow. 13.06

James Lloydovich Patterson (1933- ) signing autographs at a Moscow literary party in 1975 (he was the child actor in the clip from Tsirk above)

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01 Gamover Zaitsev

Anton “Gamover” Zaitsev (1969- ) (left) with his sidekick Boris “Bonus” Repetur (1958- ). They’re two of the most popular game-show hosts on Russian TV

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Original Author’s Foreword:

Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m as white as a fine line of Siberian cocaine. However, I do have a swole black friend who’s living the “Moscow dream” too. I decided to ask him to do a guest post on what it’s like for him in Moscow. So, big thanks to R and enjoy the post.

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Well, obviously, I can’t speak for everyone who’s dark-skinned (and by “dark-skinned” I don’t mean people from the Caucasus, commonly called “dark”, I mean people of African descent) in Russia. Anyway, here’s some feedback from my point of view on what it’s been like so far. Overall, Russia’s been good to me, Moscow more specifically. I’ve been here for over two years and had my share of odd situations. I guess, to be black in Russia is no more different from being a midget, in the sense that you stand out somewhat. When I walk down the street or am out and about, I get looks, but not all bad. In fact, most of them are not. For example, when I ride the metro, I can generally tell what type of looks I’m getting from people. You can easily stare down or ignore the occasional person who projects hatred, you can answer the standard questions asked by elderly folks or youth with courtesy and sometimes humour, and the pretty girl smiling at you gets one right back if she isn’t with a big Russian guy.

I’ve had people who openly refused to rent me a flat because I was black, but I’ve also had jobs offered to me specifically for the same reason, so… it balances out. My experience with the ladies has been the same… 50-50. I understand it’s really all about likes and dislikes, opinions, and the stereotypes that help form, shape, or influence them. I’ve met girls that associated their favourite music television hip-hop R&B songs or artists and the American black guy they just met. Sometimes, it’s funny because they think that I’ll talk, walk, or act a certain way based on the music videos they’ve seen. They sometimes refer to blacks as “exotic”. I’ve gotten the notorious “face control” at clubs and restaurants, but on the other hand, I’ve been pulled onstage, given recognition from Russian Disc Jockeys and given VIP passes, all for the same reason. Speaking the language helps, as most people who approach me, be it at the gym or in the street, are generally just curious and tend to ask similar questions, such as:

  • “How long have you lived in Russia?”
  • “Are you an African student going to University here?” (I’m American, but almost no one ever guesses that unless I’m talking English)
  • “Do you like Russian women?”
  • “Do you have a Russian girlfriend?”

After learning that I’m American, I get the other standard questions. You know them, “Do all Americans like McDonald’s?” and others along those lines. I can get into more details about a range of things, but I just wanted to give a little feedback about what it’s been like for me. Personally, I love it.

2009

England-Moscow.com

http://www.england-moscow.com/2009/10/being-black-in-moscow.html

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Saturday, 18 January 2014

18 January 2014. A Photo Essay. It Was a VERY Cossack Christmas in Volgograd…

00 Cossack Christmas in Volgograd 01. 14.01.14

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00 Cossack Christmas in Volgograd 02. 14.01.14

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00 Cossack Christmas in Volgograd 03. 14.01.14

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00 Cossack Christmas in Volgograd 04. 14.01.14

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00 Cossack Christmas in Volgograd 05. 14.01.14

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00 cossack Christmas in Volgograd 06. 14.01.14

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00 cossack Christmas in Volgograd 07. 14.01.14

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The above images show the contemporary life of the Cossacks in Volgograd Oblast. I’ll say this… Cossack honour and Cossack duty haven’t changed one bit, have they? If I had to choose between Cossack integrity and decency and the lies of a poseur like Rod Dreher (Mr Dreher issued snarky comments on Cossacks), there’s no choice for good people, is there? I know whom I favour… and I confide that most of you agree with me on this one…

BMD

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Thursday, 2 January 2014

RIA-Novosti Presents… Russia Mourns the Victims of the Volgograd Terakts

00 Mourning the Volgograd Terakt 01. 02.01.13

Russia mourns the victims of the Volgograd terakts. In less than 24 hours, two explosions took place in Volgograd… one at the Volgograd-I railway station and another in a trolleybus on the street. The authorities declared both as terrorist acts. Muscovites laid flowers and candles at the Moscow offices of the Volgograd Oblast Interest Group.

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00 Mourning the Volgograd Terakt 02. 02.01.13

The terrorist attacks resulted in more than 30 deaths and left more than 100, including children, in hospital with various injuries. An infant escaped injury due to being swaddled in a baby blanket.

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00 Mourning the Volgograd Terakt 03. 02.01.13

Doctors are fighting for the lives of the seriously injured; Volgograd homies stepped up to help them… over 600 local people donated blood for the victims.

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00 Mourning the Volgograd Terakt 04. 02.01.13

Volgograd municipal authorities cancelled all entertainment activities; they declared a local state of mourning. Initially, after the railway station explosion, the authorities declared a period of mourning to run from 1 to 3 January, but after the second attack, they lowered the flags on Monday 30 December.

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00 Mourning the Volgograd Terakt 05. 02.01.13

Kaliningraders brought flowers and candles to a square in the centre of the city in memory of those killed in the Volgograd terakts.

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00 Mourning the Volgograd Terakt 06. 02.01.13

At the same time, the Volgograd authorities reported that life in the city is running smoothly… public transport is in order, all the shops are open, traffic flows normally on the streets leading to the railway station (where the first explosion occurred).

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00 Mourning the Volgograd Terakt 07. 02.01.13

Funerals for the terakt victims took place in a cemetery in Volgograd’s Kirov Raion.

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00 Mourning the Volgograd Terakt 08. 02.01.14

Funeral for Russian Railways (RZhD) guard Sergei Nalivaiko at a cemetery in Volgograd’s Kirov Raion. Nalivaiko and his superior, Sergeant Dmitri Makovkin, died when they tried to stop the terrorist from entering the building… the terrorist set off his 10-kilo (22-pound) explosive device. Both are due to receive posthumous decorations for their selfless devotion to duty.

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00 Mourning the Volgograd Terakt 09. 02.01.13

At the funeral for Russian Railways (RZhD) guard Sergei Nalivaiko in a cemetery in Volgograd’s Kirov Raion.

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In particular, ask your priest to serve pannikhida for the Servants of God Sergei and Dmitri… without their self-sacrificial heroism, the death toll might have been much higher. They all had faces… they all had names. No one is forgotten… nothing is forgotten. There’s no such thing as “light casualties”…

BMD

31 December 2013

RIA-Novosti

http://ria.ru/photolents/20131231/987491706.html

For more on the Volgograd terakts, click here

Sunday, 3 February 2013

3 February 2013. RIA-Novosti Presents… Russia Celebrated the 70th Anniversary of the Victory at Stalingrad

00aa Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

On Friday, the site of the Родина-мать зовёт (Rodina Mat Zovyot: The Mother-Motherland Calls)  monument on Mamayev Kurgan was prepared for the celebration.

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00a Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

On Saturday, the Hero City of Volgograd celebrated the 70th anniversary of the defeat of German forces at Stalingrad. The Battle of Stalingrad took place from 17 July 1942 to 2 February 1943. The laying of wreaths and flowers at the Eternal Flame in the Alley of Heroes opened the festivities. Then, on the Square of Fallen Fighters, the local garrison paraded past in a solemn and formal review.

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00b Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

The defence of Stalingrad was the largest land battle of World War II. At one stage, both sides committed more than 2 million troops, about 30,000 guns, and more than 2,000 planes and tanks. This gigantic confrontation ended with the crushing defeat of the Nazi forces. The Battle of Stalingrad was the turning point of the war; it marked the beginning of the Red Army counterattack.

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00c Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

Festivities took place in the Hero City of Volgograd on 1 and 2 February. Volgograd Oblast authorities sent out invitations to the celebration of the anniversary of the Battle of Stalingrad to over 11,000 veterans of this battle.

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00d Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

In Volgograd, thousands of Russian and foreign guests gathered… veterans, delegations from sister cities, CIS countries, and other members of the World War II anti-fascist coalition.

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00e Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

On the eve of the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Stalingrad, discussions buzzed over the possibility of returning the “Soviet” name to the city of Volgograd. The deputies of the Volgograd City Council decided, during the celebrations devoted to the heroic defence of the city, to use the name “Hero City of Stalingrad”. Therefore, on 2 February 2013, Volgograd was called the Hero City of Stalingrad.

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00ea Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

President Vladimir Putin visited the main memorial of the battle on Mamayev Kurgan and laid a wreath there.

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00f Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

Deputy PM Dmitri Rogozin supported returning Volgograd’s name to Stalingrad.

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00g Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

In the image above, we see Dmitri Rogozin in the Square of Fallen Fighters “working the crowd” during the celebrations marking the 70th anniversary of the victory in the Battle of Stalingrad.

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00h Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

The troops of the Volgograd garrison paraded and held a review after the laying wreaths and flowers at the Eternal Flame in the Square of Fallen Fighters.

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00i Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

The parade opened with the trooping of a copy of the official symbol of the Great Victory in the Great Patriotic War… the Victory Banner. Then, a unit brought forth copies of the banners of the four fronts involved in the Battle of Stalingrad, followed by an honour guard drawn from all the branches of the Armed Forces.

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00j Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

A T-34 tank from the VOV era led the parade of the Volgograd garrison. More than a dozen examples of modern military hardware and weapons were shown on the Square of Fallen Fighters. People were able to see the latest army equipment such as the 9A52-4 Tornado-G MLRS, 2S34 Khost 12cm SP gun, 2S19 Msta-S 15.2 cm SP howitzer, 9K317 Buk-M2 SP SAM system, GAZ-2330 Tigr all-terrain multi-purpose vehicle, 2K22 Tunguska SP anti-aircraft gun-missile system, and the T-90 MBT.

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00k Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

This tank took part in a parade on Victory Day 2012 in Volgograd, then, it was on exhibition at the Stalingrad Battle Historical Museum-Memorial Panorama on Mamayev Kurgan. Next to the museum is a memorial cross with the inscription, “On 14 October, in the year 2010 since the birth of Christ, this cross was set as a sign with the blessing of Metropolitan German Timofeyev of Volgograd and Kamyshin“… some people wanted a church here, but it would’ve been a tight squeeze on the available property, so, the Kremlin vetoed it.

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00ka Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

Later, the venue of the celebrations moved to the highest point of the frontline at Stalingrad, Mamayev Kurgan.

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00l Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

There was a formal dedication of a memorial stele with the names of 17,000 defenders of Stalingrad unearthed by search organisations in the last decade from hastily-dug battlefield graves.

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00m Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

The names of these 17,000 defenders will be on 1,500 memorial plaques surrounding the memorial stele on Mamayev Kurgan.

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00n Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

At a concert in Volgograd Sports Palace, guests saw a living panorama of the Battle of Stalingrad. This presentation had a semicircular widescreen display, multi-level catwalks, and more than 2,000 participants, with songs of the VOV era performed by People’s Artist of Russia Dmitri Khvorostovsky.

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00o Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

More than 200 veterans of the Battle of Stalingrad attended the celebratory concert in honour of the 70th anniversary of the battle’s end, with 5,000 attendees in total at the gala concert.

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00oa Stalingrad Anniversary. 2013. 03.02.13

The festivities concluded with a celebratory artillery salute and fireworks.

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2 February 2013

RIA-Novosti

http://ria.ru/photolents/20130202/920976027.html#photo=920972503

http://en.rian.ru/photolents/20130203/179192703_1/Prazdnovanie-70-letiya-Stalingradskoy-bitvy.html

Editor’s Note:

There were NO images of Deputy PM Rogozin on the spread on the English side of RIA… this smells to me like at least one of the editors on the English side is a pro-Western mole, best dismissed as quickly as possible. Truly, we don’t need such self-serving Quislings amongst us. After all, Dmitri Olegovich is a patriotic nationalist, thus, he’s anti-Western to the bone… he’s especially anti-NATO and anti-American aggression. His participation in this event signals a ratcheting-up in tensions between Russia and the USA. Always watch out for the “Lenin’s Tomb” moments… they can tell you more than anything else does.

Sadly, we have people here in the Russian Orthodox diaspora who still glorify the KONR and Vlasovtsy traitors (they went from serving the godless Fascist killing machine to serving the godless American intelligence apparat). They haven’t changed their spots because of the Reconciliation… but as a friend of mine at the Centre said, “We all know about Potapov and his ilk… trust me, the SVR and FSB know about them too. I lived in the USA for some years in the nineties, and I heard and saw what these gentlemen said and did. They have no repentance for anything that they did against the Rodina”. I can testify that this observation isn’t only correct; it’s understated. I saw Jordanville’s loud espousal of Vitaly Ustinov’s stab-in-the-back to the Mother Church (you should’ve heard their loud praises of Agafangel Pashkovsky) and Victor Potapov’s unfounded gratuitous attacks on Patriarch Aleksei Ridiger (especially, his groundless smears during Aleksei’s visit to Georgetown… he owes the Church a formal and public apology for that). They’re not joining all of Russia in celebrating this victory… they cast (and still cast) mud at the victors and vilify their names. Their families supported the Fascist occupiers (and helped the Nazis round up and kill Jews)… they try to tell all and sundry that such collaboration and treason was honourable and just.

I stand four-square for the celebration of the victory at Stalingrad. That’s where all decent members of the Russian Orthodox diaspora should stand. That’s all that needs be said on the matter, isn’t it? After all, a saint, St Seraphim Vyritsky, prayed every day for the victory of the Red Army over the Fascists… no saint prayed for the victory of the collaborationist traitors. That should tell us what to do whenever a bloviating sort like Potapov opens his mouth… we shouldn’t attack him in the same manner as he lies about the Soviet past, but we should understand that his position isn’t humanly-decent, let alone god-blessed. Say a prayer for the brave fighters of the RKKA and RKKF… they helped save you from the Nazi night… NEVER forget that. Also never forget that there are those amongst us in the diaspora who aided that evil (and their families have never repented of it)… NEVER forget that also.

BMD

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